Federal - HR 1112

A bill to amend chapter 44 of title 18, United States Code, to strengthen the background check procedures to be followed before a Federal firearms licensee may transfer a firearm to a person who is not such a licensee.

Introduced

February 8, 2019

Description

A bill to amend chapter 44 of title 18, United States Code, to strengthen the background check procedures to be followed before a Federal firearms licensee may transfer a firearm to a person who is not such a licensee.

Our Position

Oppose

Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 15

Latest Actions See More/Less

  • March 5, 2019Frankel, D-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.102, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E247

  • March 5, 2019Frankel, D-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.103, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E247

  • March 5, 2019Frankel, D-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.101, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E247

  • March 5, 2019Frankel, D-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.100, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E247

  • March 5, 2019Katko, R-N.Y., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.103, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E248

  • March 5, 2019 — Placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar under the provisions of Rule XIV. Congressional Record p. S1657, S1663

  • March 4, 2019Garamendi, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.103, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E235

  • March 4, 2019Garamendi, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.101, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E235

  • March 4, 2019Garamendi, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.100, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E235

  • March 4, 2019 — Received in the Senate and read the first time. Congressional Record p. S1619, S1633

  • Feb. 28, 2019Soto, D-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.102, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E232

  • Feb. 28, 2019Soto, D-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.103, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E232

  • Feb. 28, 2019Soto, D-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.101, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E232

  • Feb. 28, 2019Soto, D-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.100, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E232

  • Feb. 28, 2019Frankel, D-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.91, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E231

  • Feb. 28, 2019Frankel, D-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.90, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E231

  • Feb. 28, 2019Soto, D-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.102, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H2293

  • Feb. 28, 2019Soto, D-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.103, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H2293

  • Feb. 28, 2019Soto, D-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.101, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H2293

  • Feb. 28, 2019Soto, D-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.100, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H2293

  • Feb. 28, 2019House Vote 103 Increased Time for Background Checks — Passage
    Passage of the bill that would require a licensed gun dealer to wait up to 20 business days, as opposed to three under current law, to hear from the FBI regarding an individual's background check, in instances in which no immediate determination on the individual had been made through the NICS system, before being allowed to complete the sale or transfer of a firearm. It would allow a prospective gun purchaser to petition the Justice Department for the weapon after 10 days. The bill would also modify the language that prohibits the sale of firearms to individuals on the basis of mental illness to bar sales to individuals "adjudicated with mental illness, severe developmental disability, or severe emotional instability." Passed 228-198. Note: A "nay" was a vote in support of the president's position. Congressional Record p. H2293

  • Feb. 28, 2019House Vote 102 Increased Time for Background Checks — Recommit
    Lesko, R-Ariz., motion to recommit the bill (HR 1112) to the House Judiciary Committee with instructions to report back immediately with an amendment that would allow a victim of domestic violence to petition the Justice Department for a firearm pending transfer, if the background check submitted by a licensed firearms dealer, manufacturer, importer or collector (licensee) has not been returned following a three-day waiting period. Motion rejected 194-232. Congressional Record p. H2291-H2293

  • Feb. 28, 2019House Vote 101 Increased Time for Background Checks — Pick Up Time Requirement
    Van Drew, D-N.J., amendment that would allow a federally licensed firearms dealer, importer, manufacturer or collector (licensee) to rely on a background check certifying that an individual meets legal requirements to purchase or receive transfer of a firearm for 25 days after the licensee is notified, if the licensee is notified more than 3 days after initial contact. The amendment would specify that the provisions of the bill would take effect 210 days after enactment. Adopted in Committee of the Whole 234-193. Congressional Record p. H2288-H2289, H2290-H2291

  • Feb. 28, 2019 — Porter, D-Calif., amendment no. 4 that would require the attorney general, in consultation with the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence and Firearms, to submit a report to Congress on the effect of the measure on the safety of victims of domestic violence and similar crimes and if further amendments to the background check process would decrease such risks, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H2287-H2288

  • Feb. 28, 2019 — Levin, D-Mich., amendment no. 3 that would require the Government Accountability Office to submit a report to Congress on the implementation of the measure and how the measure prevented firearms from being transferred to prohibited persons, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H2287

  • Feb. 28, 2019House Vote 100 Increased Time for Background Checks — Report on Extended Check Petitions
    Schneider, D-Ill., amendment that would require the FBI to report to the public on the the number of petitions received from prospective gun purchasers in instances in which a National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) determination was not made within 10 days. Adopted in Committee of the Whole 282-144. Congressional Record p. H2285-H2287, H2289-H2290

  • Feb. 28, 2019 — Rice, R-S.C., amendment no. 1 that would require the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) to include a search of the database of the National Data Exchange in its searches, withdrawn by unanimous consent. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H2284-H2285

  • Feb. 28, 2019 — Considered by the House. Congressional Record p. H2277-H2293

  • Feb. 27, 2019Adam Smith, D-Wash., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.91, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E222

  • Feb. 27, 2019Adam Smith, D-Wash., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.90, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E222

  • Feb. 27, 2019Wagner, R-Mo., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.91, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E217

  • Feb. 27, 2019Wagner, R-Mo., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.90, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E217

  • Feb. 26, 2019S. King, R-Iowa, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.91, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H2130

  • Feb. 26, 2019S. King, R-Iowa, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.90, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H2130

  • Feb. 26, 2019S. King, R-Iowa, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.91, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H2130

  • Feb. 26, 2019S. King, R-Iowa, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.90, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H2130

  • Feb. 26, 2019Cohen, D-Tenn., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.91, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E212

  • Feb. 26, 2019Cohen, D-Tenn., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.90, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E212

  • Feb. 26, 2019House Vote 91 Measures Expanding Background Checks — Rule
    Adoption of the rule (H Res 145) that would provide for House floor consideration of the Bipartisan Background Checks Act (HR 8) and the Enhanced Background Checks Act (HR 1112). Adopted 227-194. Congressional Record p. H2128

  • Feb. 26, 2019House Vote 90 Measures Expanding Background Checks — Previous Question
    Raskin, D-Md., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 145) that would provide for House floor consideration of the Bipartisan Background Checks Act (HR 8) and the Enhanced Background Checks Act (HR 1112). Motion agreed to 229-191. Congressional Record p. H2127-H2128

  • Feb. 25, 2019 — Rules Committee resolution, H Res 145, reported to the House as a rule for HR 1112.

  • Feb. 25, 2019Statement of Administration Policy issued by Office of Management and Budget.

  • Feb. 25, 2019 — House Rules Committee granted a structured rule providing for consideration of the bill. Congressional Record p. H2068

  • Feb. 25, 2019 — Full committee proceeding held by the House Rules Committee.

  • Feb. 22, 2019 — Reported to the House amended by the House Judiciary Committee and placed on the Union Calendar. H Rept 116-12Congressional Record p. H2046

  • Feb. 22, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 13

    Cicilline, (D-R.I.)Malinowski, (D-N.J.)Schneider, (D-Ill.)
    Davis, D. (D-Ill.)Ocasio-Cortez, (D-N.Y.)Sherman, (D-Calif.)
    Demings, (D-Fla.)Omar, (D-Minn.)Suozzi, (D-N.Y.)
    Khanna, (D-Calif.)Raskin, (D-Md.)
    Levin, (D-Mich.)Rouda, (D-Calif.)
  • Feb. 13, 2019 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Judiciary Committee.

    Feb. 13, 2019 — Committee Vote: Firearm Transfer Background Check Procedures — Mental Illness
    Lofgren, D-Calif. —

    Amendment to the Collins, R-Ga., amendment that would strike language that would prohibit individuals "adjudicated with mental illness" from purchasing firearms and replace it with language to specify that individuals adjudicated as "severe developmental disability or severe emotional disorder" are prohibited from purchasing firearms.

    Amendment to the Collins, R-Ga., amendment that would strike language that would prohibit individuals "adjudicated with mental illness" from purchasing firearms and replace it with language to specify that individuals adjudicated as "severe developmental disability or severe emotional disorder" are prohibited from purchasing firearms.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    Feb. 13, 2019 — Committee Vote: Firearm Transfer Background Check Procedures — Mental Illness
      D. Collins, R-Ga. —

    Amendment that would specify that individuals adjudicated as "severe developmental disability or severe emotional disorder" are prohibited from purchasing firearms.

    Amendment that would specify that individuals adjudicated as "severe developmental disability or severe emotional disorder" are prohibited from purchasing firearms.

    Adopted (as amended) by voice vote.

    Feb. 13, 2019 — Committee Vote: Firearm Transfer Background Check Procedures — Notification for Immigrant Gun Purchase Attempt
      Cline, R-Va. —

    Amendment that would add language to clarify that immigration enforcement officials would be notified when an immigrant in the country illegally failed a background check for a firearm purchase.

    Amendment that would add language to clarify that immigration enforcement officials would be notified when an immigrant in the country illegally failed a background check for a firearm purchase.

    Ruled not germane. Note: <p>Lofgren, D-Calif., raised a point of order that the Cline, R-Va., amendment violated committee rules.</p>

    Feb. 13, 2019 — Committee Vote: Firearm Transfer Background Check Procedures — Information about Gun Purchasers
      Gohmert, R-Texas —

    Amendment that would require the attorney general to ensure that the national instant criminal background check system uses all descriptors for the person applying for a background check for a gun purchase, including the person's exact name on the firearm transfer record.

    Amendment that would require the attorney general to ensure that the national instant criminal background check system uses all descriptors for the person applying for a background check for a gun purchase, including the person's exact name on the firearm transfer record.

    Ruled not germane. Note: <p>Lofgren, D-Calif., raised a point of order that the Gohmert, R-Texas, amendment violated committee rules.</p>

    Feb. 13, 2019 — Committee Vote: Firearm Transfer Background Check Procedures — Vote to Report

    Extend, from three business days to 10 business days, the waiting period for the results of a background check for a firearm purchase under the national instant criminal background check system.

    Before a sale can be made, it also would require the seller to petition the Justice Department, electronically through a website established by the attorney general or by first-class mail, for review that certifies that the seller has no reason to believe that the recipient is prohibited by federal, state or local law from purchasing or possessing a firearm and requests that the system respond within 10 days of the submission of the petition.

    It also would require the attorney general to provide written notice of the receipt of the petition, either electronically or by first-class mail, and to respond expeditiously to such petitions.

    As amended, it would specify that individuals adjudicated as "severe developmental disability or severe emotional disorder" are prohibited from purchasing firearms.

    Extend, from three business days to 10 business days, the waiting period for the results of a background check for a firearm purchase under the national instant criminal background check system.

    Before a sale can be made, it also would require the seller to petition the Justice Department, electronically through a website established by the attorney general or by first-class mail, for review that certifies that the seller has no reason to believe that the recipient is prohibited by federal, state or local law from purchasing or possessing a firearm and requests that the system respond within 10 days of the submission of the petition.

    It also would require the attorney general to provide written notice of the receipt of the petition, either electronically or by first-class mail, and to respond expeditiously to such petitions.

    As amended, it would specify that individuals adjudicated as "severe developmental disability or severe emotional disorder" are prohibited from purchasing firearms.

    Ordered reported favorably to the full House (as amended) 21-14.
  • Feb. 8, 2019 — Original cosponsor(s): 2

    Cunningham, (D-S.C.)King, P. (R-N.Y.)
  • Feb. 8, 2019 — Read twice and referred to: House Judiciary.Congressional Record p. H1491