Federal - HR 3755

"Women's Health Protection Act" (Abortion Without Limits Until Birth Act)

Introduced

June 8, 2021

Description

H.R. 3755, formally titled the "Women's Health Protection Act," is sponsored by Rep. Judy Chu (D-Ca.).  The bill is strongly supported by the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, NARAL, and numerous other pro-abortion activist groups.  A more accurate title for this radical bill would be the "Abortion Without Limits Until Birth Act."  The bill, if enacted and upheld by the federal courts, would invalidate nearly all state limitations on abortion, including waiting periods and women's right-to-know laws.  For example, it would invalidate state laws to protect pain-capable unborn children after 20 weeks fetal age -- and would require all states to allow abortion even during the final three months of pregnancy based on an abortionist's claim of "health" benefits, including mental health.  It would also invalidate nearly all existing federal laws limiting abortion.

For further information on this sweeping legislation, click here.  The Senate companion bill, sponsored by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Ct.), is S.1975.National Right to Life strongly opposes H.R. 3755.

Our Position

Oppose

Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 215

Latest Actions See More/Less

  • May 3, 2022 — Companion measure, S 4132, introduced by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.).

  • Feb. 28, 2022 — Schumer, D-N.Y., motion to proceed to the bill, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S819-S826

  • Feb. 28, 2022Senate Vote 65 Abortion Access Protections — Cloture
    Motion to invoke cloture on the Schumer, D-N.Y., motion to proceed to the bill. Motion rejected 46-48. Note: Sixty votes (60) are required to invoke cloture on legislation. Congressional Record p. S826

  • Feb. 17, 2022 — Schumer, D-N.Y., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the Schumer motion to proceed to the bill (60 votes required), pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S797

  • Feb. 17, 2022 — Schumer, D-N.Y., motion to proceed to the bill, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S797

  • Sept. 29, 2021 — Placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar under the provisions of Rule XIV. Congressional Record p. S6750, S6776

  • Sept. 28, 2021 — Taken from the desk and read the first time. Congressional Record p. S6737, S6746

  • Sept. 27, 2021 — Received in the Senate and held at the desk. Congressional Record p. S6697

  • Sept. 24, 2021Lesko, R-Ariz., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.295, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H5159

  • Sept. 24, 2021Lawson, D-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.295, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H5159

  • Sept. 24, 2021Lesko, R-Ariz., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.294, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H5159

  • Sept. 24, 2021Cheney, R-Wyo., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.295, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H5159

  • Sept. 24, 2021Cheney, R-Wyo., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.294, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H5159

  • Sept. 24, 2021House Vote 295 Abortion Access Protections — Passage
    Passage of the bill that would statutorily establish that health care providers have a right to provide and patients have a right to receive abortion services, and it would prohibit certain restrictions related to abortion services. The bill would specify that rights established by the bill may not be restricted by certain requirements or limitations related to abortion services, including prohibitions on abortion prior to fetal viability, or after fetal viability if a provider determines that continuation of a pregnancy would pose a risk to a patient's life or health; requirements that patients disclose reasons for seeking an abortion or make medically unnecessary in-person appointments; requirements that providers provide medically inaccurate information or perform specific medical tests or procedures in connection with the provision of abortion services; limitations on providers' ability to prescribe drugs based on good-faith medical judgment, provide services via telemedicine or provide immediate services when a delay would pose a risk to a patient's health; and requirements for facilities and personnel that would not apply to facilities providing medically comparable procedures. It would also prohibit requirements or limitations that are similar to those established by the bill or that impede access to abortion services and expressly or implicitly single out abortion services, providers or facilities. It would specify factors that courts may consider to determine whether a requirement or limitation impedes access to abortion services, including whether it interferes with providers' ability to provide services; poses a risk to patients' health; is likely to delay or deter patients in accessing services or necessitate in-person visits that would not otherwise be required; is likely to result in a decreased availability of services in a state or region; is likely to result in increased costs of providing or obtaining services; or imposes penalites that are not imposed on other health care providers for comparable conduct. It would require a party defending a requirement or limitation to establish that it significantly advances the safety of abortion services or patient health and that such goals cannot be advanced by a less restrictive alternative measure. It would authorize the Justice Department, health care providers and private individuals and entities to bring a civil action in U.S. district court for injunctive relief against any state or government official charged with implementing or enforcing a requirement or limitation challenged as a violation of rights established by the bill. It would authorize district courts to award appropriate equitable relief, including temporary, preliminary or permanent injunctive relief, and to award costs of litigation to a prevailing plaintiff. It would require courts to "liberally construe" provisions of the bill to effectuate its purposes. Passed 218-211. Note: A "yea" was a vote in support of the president's position. 46 members voted remotely by proxy, pursuant to the provisions of H Res 8 during the public health emergency period related to COVID-19. Congressional Record p. H5159

  • Sept. 24, 2021House Vote 294 Abortion Access Protections — Recommit
    Letlow, R-La., motion to recommit the bill to the House Energy and Commerce Committee. Motion rejected 210-219. Note: Pursuant to the provisions of H Res 8, members were able to vote remotely by proxy during the public health emergency period related to COVID-19. Congressional Record p. H5157-H5159

  • Sept. 24, 2021 — Considered by the House. Congressional Record p. H5139-H5159

  • Sept. 24, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Plaskett, (D-V.I.)
  • Sept. 21, 2021Lesko, R-Ariz., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.264, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H4577

  • Sept. 21, 2021Lesko, R-Ariz., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.263, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H4577

  • Sept. 21, 2021Grothman, R-Wis., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.264, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H4576

  • Sept. 21, 2021B. Lee, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.263, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H4575

  • Sept. 21, 2021House Vote 264 Abortion Access Protections; Fiscal 2022 Defense Authorization; Fiscal 2022 Short-Term Appropriations and Debt Suspension — Rule
    Adoption of the rule (H Res 667) that would provide for House floor consideration of the Women's Health Protection Act (HR 3755), the fiscal 2022 defense authorization bill (HR 4350), and the continuing resolution including supplemental appropriations and a debt limit suspension (HR 5305). The rule would provide for up to one hour of general debate for each of the bills and floor consideration of 476 amendments to HR 4350. It would provide for automatic adoption of a Pallone, D-N.J., manager's amendment to HR 3755 that would make technical modifications and a number of clarifications related to enforcement of the bill's provisions against states and government officials, including to specify that the bill's definition of "state" includes any unit of local government; that any person permitted to implement or enforce a limitation or requirement prohibited by the bill is considered a government official; that the Justice Department and private individuals or entities may bring a civil action against states (in addition to government officials) under the bill's provisions; and that states and government officials are not immune under the 10th or 11th amendments to the Constitution or any other law with regard to legal action under the bill's provisions. It would provide for automatic adoption of a Smith, D-Wash., manager's amendment to HR 4350 that would strike language requiring a three-quarters affirmative vote in both chambers with regard to passage of a joint resolution approving the appointment of an individual as Defense secretary who was relieved within the previous 10 years from active duty at or above the sixth officer pay grade, which includes the ranks of colonel or captain. The amendment would also make numerous adjustments to funding levels authorized by the bill for certain military procurement, research and development, and operation and maintenance activities. The rule would authorize, through the legislative day of Sept. 24, 2021, non-debatable motions by the majority leader or a designee to suspend the rules and consider, en bloc, measures that were previously considered under suspension of the rules on July 26, July 27 or Sept. 21. It would also allow proceedings on such measures to be postponed through Oct. 1. It would authorize through Oct. 27 certain routine authorities for House proceedings, including for consideration of motions to suspend the rules and same-day consideration of Rules Committee resolutions. Finally, the rule would vacate the request for a recorded vote on a bill (S 2382) considered under suspension of the rules on July 26, such that the motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill be considered as withdrawn. Adopted 217-207. Note: 28 members voted remotely by proxy, pursuant to the provisions of H Res 8 during the public health emergency period related to COVID-19. Congressional Record p. H4575-H4576

  • Sept. 21, 2021House Vote 263 Abortion Access Protections; Fiscal 2022 Defense Authorization; Fiscal 2022 Short-Term Appropriations and Debt Suspension — Previous Question
    Ross, D-N.C., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 667) that would provide for House floor consideration of the Women's Health Protection Act (HR 3755), the fiscal 2022 defense authorization bill (HR 4350), and the continuing resolution including supplemental appropriations and a debt limit suspension (HR 5305). The rule would provide for up to one hour of general debate for each of the bills and floor consideration of 476 amendments to HR 4350. It would provide for automatic adoption of a Pallone, D-N.J., manager's amendment to HR 3755 that would make technical modifications and a number of clarifications related to enforcement of the bill's provisions against states and government officials, including to specify that the bill's definition of "state" includes any unit of local government; that any person permitted to implement or enforce a limitation or requirement prohibited by the bill is considered a government official; that the Justice Department and private individuals or entities may bring a civil action against states (in addition to government officials) under the bill's provisions; and that states and government officials are not immune under the 10th or 11th amendments to the Constitution or any other law with regard to legal action under the bill's provisions. It would provide for automatic adoption of a Smith, D-Wash., manager's amendment to HR 4350 that would strike language requiring a three-quarters affirmative vote in both chambers with regard to passage of a joint resolution approving the appointment of an individual as Defense secretary who was relieved within the previous 10 years from active duty at or above the sixth officer pay grade, which includes the ranks of colonel or captain. The amendment would also make numerous adjustments to funding levels authorized by the bill for certain military procurement, research and development, and operation and maintenance activities. The rule would authorize, through the legislative day of Sept. 24, 2021, non-debatable motions by the majority leader or a designee to suspend the rules and consider, en bloc, measures that were previously considered under suspension of the rules on July 26, July 27 or Sept. 21. It would also allow proceedings on such measures to be postponed through Oct. 1. It would authorize through Oct. 27 certain routine authorities for House proceedings, including for consideration of motions to suspend the rules and same-day consideration of Rules Committee resolutions.Finally, the rule would vacate the request for a recorded vote on a bill (S 2382) considered under suspension of the rules on July 26, such that the motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill be considered as withdrawn. Motion agreed to 218-210. Note: 29 members voted remotely by proxy, pursuant to the provisions of H Res 8 during the public health emergency period related to COVID-19. Congressional Record p. H4575

  • Sept. 21, 2021 — Rules Committee resolution, H Res 667, reported to the House as a rule for HR 3755.

  • Sept. 21, 2021 — House Rules Committee granted a closed rule providing for consideration of the bill. Congressional Record p. H4564, H4862

  • Sept. 21, 2021 — Full committee proceeding held by the House Rules Committee.

  • Sept. 20, 2021Statement of Administration Policy issued by Office of Management and Budget.

  • Sept. 20, 2021 — Full committee proceeding held by the House Rules Committee.

  • Sept. 17, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Garamendi, (D-Calif.)
  • Sept. 14, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Bishop, S. (D-Ga.)Clyburn, (D-S.C.)
  • Sept. 10, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 6

    Carter, (D-La.)Harder, (D-Calif.)Mfume, (D-Md.)
    Eshoo, (D-Calif.)Langevin, (D-R.I.)Thompson, B. (D-Miss.)
  • Sept. 3, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 13

    Bowman, (D-N.Y.)Lamb, (D-Pa.)Spanberger, (D-Va.)
    Bustos, (D-Ill.)Phillips, (D-Minn.)Stansbury, (D-N.M.)
    Craig, (D-Minn.)Scott, R. (D-Va.)Wexton, (D-Va.)
    Jeffries, (D-N.Y.)Sherrill, (D-N.J.)
    Kaptur, (D-Ohio)Slotkin, (D-Mich.)
  • Aug. 31, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Norcross, (D-N.J.)
  • Aug. 17, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Correa, (D-Calif.)
  • Aug. 13, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Malinowski, (D-N.J.)
  • Aug. 10, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Stevens, (D-Mich.)
  • July 22, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Luria, (D-Va.)Rush, (D-Ill.)
  • July 19, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Veasey, (D-Texas)
  • June 29, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Scott, D. (D-Ga.)
  • June 25, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Bourdeaux, (D-Ga.)
  • June 22, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Roybal-Allard, (D-Calif.)
  • June 15, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Axne, (D-Iowa)
  • June 11, 2021 — Additional cosponsor(s): 9

    Aguilar, (D-Calif.)Hoyer, (D-Md.)Porter, (D-Calif.)
    Bass, (D-Calif.)Kildee, (D-Mich.)Quigley, (D-Ill.)
    Dingell, (D-Mich.)Leger Fernandez, (D-N.M.)Torres, (D-Calif.)
  • June 8, 2021 — Original cosponsor(s): 172

    Adams, (D-N.C.)Green, A. (D-Texas)O'Halleran, (D-Ariz.)
    Allred, (D-Texas)Grijalva, (D-Ariz.)Ocasio-Cortez, (D-N.Y.)
    Auchincloss, (D-Mass.)Hayes, (D-Conn.)Omar, (D-Minn.)
    Barragan, (D-Calif.)Higgins, B. (D-N.Y.)Panetta, (D-Calif.)
    Beatty, (D-Ohio)Himes, (D-Conn.)Pappas, (D-N.H.)
    Bera, (D-Calif.)Horsford, (D-Nev.)Pascrell (D-N.J.)
    Beyer (D-Va.)Houlahan, (D-Pa.)Payne (D-N.J.)
    Blumenauer, (D-Ore.)Huffman, (D-Calif.)Perlmutter, (D-Colo.)
    Blunt Rochester, (D-Del.)Jackson Lee, (D-Texas)Peters, S. (D-Calif.)
    Bonamici, (D-Ore.)Jacobs, (D-Calif.)Pingree, (D-Maine)
    Boyle, (D-Pa.)Jayapal, (D-Wash.)Pocan, (D-Wis.)
    Brown, A. (D-Md.)Johnson, E.B. (D-Texas)Pressley, (D-Mass.)
    Brownley, (D-Calif.)Johnson, H. (D-Ga.)Price, (D-N.C.)
    Bush, (D-Mo.)Jones, (D-N.Y.)Raskin, (D-Md.)
    Butterfield, (D-N.C.)Kahele, (D-Hawaii)Rice, K. (D-N.Y.)
    Carbajal, (D-Calif.)Keating, (D-Mass.)Ross, (D-N.C.)
    Cardenas, (D-Calif.)Kelly, R. (D-Ill.)Ruiz, (D-Calif.)
    Carson, (D-Ind.)Khanna, (D-Calif.)Ruppersberger, (D-Md.)
    Cartwright, (D-Pa.)Kilmer, (D-Wash.)Ryan, T. (D-Ohio)
    Case, (D-Hawaii)Kim, (D-N.J.)Sanchez, (D-Calif.)
    Casten, (D-Ill.)Kind, (D-Wis.)Sarbanes, (D-Md.)
    Castor, (D-Fla.)Kirkpatrick, (D-Ariz.)Scanlon, (D-Pa.)
    Castro, (D-Texas)Krishnamoorthi, (D-Ill.)Schakowsky, (D-Ill.)
    Cicilline, (D-R.I.)Kuster, (D-N.H.)Schiff, (D-Calif.)
    Clarke, Y. (D-N.Y.)Larsen, R. (D-Wash.)Schneider, (D-Ill.)
    Clark, K. (D-Mass.)Larson, J. (D-Conn.)Schrader, (D-Ore.)
    Cleaver (D-Mo.)Lawrence, (D-Mich.)Schrier, (D-Wash.)
    Cohen, (D-Tenn.)Lawson, (D-Fla.)Sewell, (D-Ala.)
    Connolly, (D-Va.)Lee, B. (D-Calif.)Sherman, (D-Calif.)
    Cooper, (D-Tenn.)Lee, (D-Nev.)Sires, (D-N.J.)
    Costa, (D-Calif.)Levin, (D-Mich.)Smith, Adam (D-Wash.)
    Courtney, (D-Conn.)Levin, (D-Calif.)Soto, (D-Fla.)
    Crist, (D-Fla.)Lieu, (D-Calif.)Speier, (D-Calif.)
    Crow, (D-Colo.)Lofgren, (D-Calif.)Stanton, (D-Ariz.)
    Davids, (D-Kan.)Lowenthal, (D-Calif.)Strickland, (D-Wash.)
    Davis, D. (D-Ill.)Lynch, (D-Mass.)Suozzi, (D-N.Y.)
    Dean, (D-Pa.)Maloney, C. (D-N.Y.)Swalwell, (D-Calif.)
    DeFazio, (D-Ore.)Maloney, S.P. (D-N.Y.)Takano, (D-Calif.)
    DeGette, (D-Colo.)Manning, (D-N.C.)Thompson, M. (D-Calif.)
    DeLauro, (D-Conn.)Matsui, (D-Calif.)Titus, (D-Nev.)
    DelBene, (D-Wash.)McBath, (D-Ga.)Tlaib, (D-Mich.)
    Delgado, (D-N.Y.)McCollum, (D-Minn.)Tonko, (D-N.Y.)
    Demings, (D-Fla.)McEachin, (D-Va.)Torres, (D-N.Y.)
    DeSaulnier, (D-Calif.)McGovern, (D-Mass.)Trahan, (D-Mass.)
    Deutch, (D-Fla.)McNerney, (D-Calif.)Trone, (D-Md.)
    Doggett, (D-Texas)Meeks, (D-N.Y.)Underwood, (D-Ill.)
    Doyle, (D-Pa.)Meng, (D-N.Y.)Vargas, (D-Calif.)
    Escobar, (D-Texas)Moore, (D-Wis.)Velazquez, (D-N.Y.)
    Espaillat, (D-N.Y.)Morelle, (D-N.Y.)Wasserman Schultz, (D-Fla.)
    Evans, (D-Pa.)Moulton, (D-Mass.)Waters, Maxine (D-Calif.)
    Fletcher, (D-Texas)Mrvan, (D-Ind.)Watson Coleman, (D-N.J.)
    Foster, (D-Ill.)Murphy, S. (D-Fla.)Welch, (D-Vt.)
    Frankel, (D-Fla.)Nadler, (D-N.Y.)Wild, (D-Pa.)
    Gallego, (D-Ariz.)Napolitano, (D-Calif.)Williams, (D-Ga.)
    Garcia, (D-Ill.)Neal, (D-Mass.)Wilson, F. (D-Fla.)
    Garcia, (D-Texas)Neguse, (D-Colo.)Yarmuth, (D-Ky.)
    Gomez, (D-Calif.)Newman, (D-Ill.)
    Gottheimer, (D-N.J.)Norton, (D-D.C.)
  • June 8, 2021 — Companion measure, S 1975, introduced by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.).

  • June 8, 2021 — Read twice and referred to: House Energy and Commerce.Congressional Record p. H2698