Federal - HR 1957

Great American Outdoors Act

Introduced

March 28, 2019

Description

This bill establishes the National Parks and Public Land Legacy Restoration Fund to support deferred maintenance projects on federal lands.

For FY2021-FY2025, there shall be deposited into the fund an amount equal to 50% of energy development revenues credited, covered, or deposited as miscellaneous receipts from oil, gas, coal, or alternative or renewable energy development on federal lands and waters. Deposited amounts must not exceed $1.9 billion for any fiscal year.

The fund must be used for priority deferred maintenance projects in specified systems that are administered by

  • the National Park Service,
  • the Forest Service,
  • the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
  • the Bureau of Land Management, and
  • the Bureau of Indian Education.

The Government Accountability Office must report on the effect of the fund in reducing the backlog of priority deferred maintenance projects for the specified agencies.

Additionally, the bill makes funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) permanent. The President shall annually report to Congress specified details regarding the allocation of funds to the LWCF. Congress may provide for alternate allocations using specified procedures.

Our Position

Support

Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 28

Latest Actions See More/Less

  • Aug. 25, 2020Timmons, R-S.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.155, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E792

  • Aug. 25, 2020Timmons, R-S.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.140, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E792

  • Aug. 25, 2020Timmons, R-S.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.139, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E792

  • Aug. 4, 2020 — Became Public Law, PL 116-152, 134 Stat. 682.

  • Aug. 4, 2020 — Signed by the president.

  • July 30, 2020Holding, R-N.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.155, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E707

  • July 27, 2020Mullin, R-Okla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no. 155, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E683

  • July 27, 2020Mullin, R-Okla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.140, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E683

  • July 27, 2020Mullin, R-Okla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.139, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E683

  • July 26, 2020Rutherford, R-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.140, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E681

  • July 26, 2020Rutherford, R-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.139, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E681

  • July 23, 2020Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.155, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E668

  • July 23, 2020 — Enrolled measure signed in the Senate. Congressional Record p. S4468

  • July 23, 2020 — Enrolled measure signed in the House. Congressional Record p. H3836

  • July 22, 2020Roby, R-Ala., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.155, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E665

  • July 22, 2020Palmer, R-Ala., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.140, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E663

  • July 22, 2020Palmer, R-Ala., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.139, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E663

  • July 22, 2020Newhouse, R-Wash., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.140, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E663

  • July 22, 2020Newhouse, R-Wash., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.139, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E663

  • July 22, 2020Hudson, R-N.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.140, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E661

  • July 22, 2020Hudson, R-N.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.139, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E661

  • July 22, 2020 — Measure cleared for the president. Congressional Record p. H3667-H3668

  • July 22, 2020House Vote 155 Public Land Conservation Funds — Motion to Concur
    Grijalva, D-Ariz., motion to concur in the Senate amendment to the Great American Outdoors Act that would permanently fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund at $900 million annually and establish for maintenance of national parks and other public lands. It would require 50% of U.S. energy development revenues to be deposited into the restoration fund annually for fiscal 2021 through 2025, up to a maximum of $1.9 billion annually. Among other provisions regarding the restoration fund, it would allocate 70% of funding to the National Park Service and 15% to the U.S. Forest Service. It would allow no more than 35% of funds to be used for transportation projects and prohibit the use of funds for land acquisition, employee bonuses or to supplant discretionary funding. It would require the Interior and Agriculture Departments to submit to Congress a list of priority deferred maintenance projects to be funded for fiscal 2021. It would allow the departments to accept public donations to the fund and require them to incorporate measures to improve the accessibility of public lands to individuals with disabilities. Motion agreed to 310-107. Note: A "yea" is a vote in support of the president's position. 31 members voted remotely by proxy, pursuant to the provisions of H Res 965 during the public health emergency period related to COVID-19. Congressional Record p. H3667-H3668

  • July 22, 2020 — Grijalva, D-Ariz., motion to concur in the Senate amendment to the bill, agreed to by roll call vote, 310-107. Congressional Record p. H3642-H3657, H3667-H3668

  • July 21, 2020Palazzo, R-Miss., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.140, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E656

  • July 21, 2020Palazzo, R-Miss., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.139, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E656

  • July 21, 2020Bucshon, R-Ind., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.140, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E656

  • July 21, 2020Bucshon, R-Ind., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.139, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E656

  • July 20, 2020Roby, R-Ala., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.140, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H3505

  • July 20, 2020Roby, R-Ala., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.139, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H3505

  • July 20, 2020S. King, R-Iowa, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.140, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H3505

  • July 20, 2020S. King, R-Iowa, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.139, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H3505

  • July 20, 2020Jackson Lee, D-Texas, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.140, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H3584

  • July 20, 2020Jackson Lee, D-Texas, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.139, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H3584

  • July 20, 2020House Vote 140 Fiscal 2021 Defense Authorization; Child Care Grants; Child Care Tax Credits; Public Land Conservation — Rule
    Adoption of the rule (H Res 1053) that would provide for floor consideration of the fiscal 2021 defense authorization bill (HR 6395); the Child Care is Essential Act (HR 7027); the Child Care for Economic Recovery Act (HR 7327); and the Senate amendment to the Great American Outdoors Act (HR 1957), via motion to concur. The rule would provide for floor consideration of 407 amendments to HR 6395. It would also provide for House proceedings through September, 21, 2020, including to provide for consideration of motions to suspend the rules through September 20 and provide for same-day consideration of House Rules Committee resolutions through September 21. Adopted 224-166. Note: 39 members voted remotely by proxy, pursuant to the provisions of H Res 965 during the public health emergency period related to COVID-19. Congressional Record p. H3109

  • July 20, 2020House Vote 139 Fiscal 2021 Defense Authorization; Child Care Grants; Child Care Tax Credits; Public Land Conservation Funds — Previous Question
    Perlmutter, D-Colo., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 1053) that would provide for floor consideration of the fiscal 2021 defense authorization bill (HR 6395); the Child Care is Essential Act (HR 7027); the Child Care for Economic Recovery Act (HR 7327); and the Senate amendment to the Great American Outdoors Act (HR 1957), via motion to concur. The rule would provide for floor consideration of 407 amendments to HR 6395. It would also provide for House proceedings through September, 21, 2020, including to provide for consideration of motions to suspend the rules through September 20 and provide for same-day consideration of House Rules Committee resolutions through September 21. Motion agreed to 220-162. Note: 37 members voted remotely by proxy, pursuant to the provisions of H Res 965 during the public health emergency period related to COVID-19. Congressional Record p. H3107

  • July 20, 2020 — Rules Committee resolution, H Res 1053, reported to the House as a rule for HR 1957.

  • July 20, 2020 — House Rules Committee granted a closed rule providing for consideration of the Senate amendment to the bill. Congressional Record p. H3586

  • July 17, 2020 — Full committee proceeding held by the House Rules Committee.

  • June 17, 2020Senate Vote 121 Public Land Conservation Funds — Passage
    Passage of the bill, as amended, that would permanently fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund at $900 million annually and establish a fund for maintenance of national parks and other public lands. It would require 50% of U.S. energy development revenues to be deposited into the restoration fund annually for fiscal 2021 through 2025, up to a maximum of $1.9 billion annually. Among other provisions regarding the restoration fund, it would allocate 70% of funding to the National Park Service and 15% to the U.S. Forest Service. It would allow no more than 35% of funds to be used for transportation projects and prohibit the use of funds for land acquisition, employee bonuses or to supplant discretionary funding. It would require the Interior and Agriculture Departments to submit to Congress a list of priority deferred maintenance projects to be funded for fiscal 2021. It would allow the departments to accept public donations to the fund and require them to incorporate measures to improve the accessibility of public lands to individuals with disabilities. Passed 73-25. Congressional Record p. S3038

  • June 17, 2020 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S3027-S3038

  • June 16, 2020 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S2982-S3010

  • June 15, 2020Senate Vote 118 Public Land Conservation Funds — Motion to Waive
    Gardner, R-Colo., motion to waive all applicable sections of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 and applicable budget resolutions with respect to the McConnell, R-Ky., for Gardner substitute amendment no. 1617 to the bill that would permanently fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund and establish a fund for maintenance of national parks and other public lands. Motion agreed to 68-30. Note: Three-fifths of the total Senate (60) is required to waive applicable sections of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 and applicable budget resolutions. Congressional Record p. S2970-S2972

  • June 15, 2020 — Enzi, R-Wyo., point of order that the McConnell, R-Ky., for Gardner, R-Colo., substitute amendment no. 1617 to the bill violates 4106(a) of the fiscal 2018 Budget Resolution, fell when a motion to waive was agreed to. Congressional Record p. S2970-S2972

  • June 15, 2020Senate Vote 120 Public Land Conservation Funds — Cloture
    McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the bill, as amended, that would permanently fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund at $900 million annually and establish a fund for maintenance of national parks and other public lands. It would require 50% of U.S. energy development revenues to be deposited into the restoration fund annually for fiscal 2021 through 2025, up to a maximum of $1.9 billion annually. Motion agreed to 75-23. Note: Three-fifths of the total Senate (60) is required to invoke cloture. Congressional Record p. S2960-S2972

  • June 15, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1629 to amendment no. 1628, fell when amendment no. 1628 was tabled. Congressional Record p. S2960-S2972

  • June 15, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1627 to amendment no. 1626, fell when amendment no. 1626 was tabled. Congressional Record p. S2960-S2972

  • June 15, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1628 to the bill, tabled by voice vote. Congressional Record p. S2960-S2972

  • June 15, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1626 to McConnell, R-Ky., for Gardner, R-Colo., substitute amendment no. 1617, tabled by voice vote. Congressional Record p. S2960-S2972

  • June 15, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., for Gardner, R-Colo., substitute amendment no. 1617, adopted by roll call vote, 73-24. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S2960-S2972

  • June 15, 2020 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S2960-S2972

  • June 12, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1632 to amendment no. 1631, fell when McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1631 fell. Congressional Record p. S2949-S2956

  • June 12, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1631 to the instructions to commit the bill, fell when the McConnell, R-Ky., motion to commit fell. Congressional Record p. S2949-S2956

  • June 12, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to commit the bill to the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee with instructions to report it back immediately with an amendment no. 1630, fell when cloture was invoked on the McConnell, R-Ky., for Gardner, R-Colo., substitute amendment no. 1617. Congressional Record p. S2949-S2956

  • June 12, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the bill (60 votes required), pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2949-S2956

  • June 12, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1627 to amendment no. 1626, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2949-S2956

  • June 12, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1629 to amendment no. 1628, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2949-S2956

  • June 12, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1628, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2949-S2956

  • June 12, 2020Senate Vote 117 Public Land Conservation Funds — Cloture
    McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the McConnell for Gardner, R-Colo., substitute amendment no. 1617 to the legislative vehicle for a bill that would permanently fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund and establish a fund for maintenance of national parks and other public lands. Motion agreed to 65-19. Note: Three-fifths of the total Senate (60) is required to invoke cloture. Congressional Record p. S2949-S2956

  • June 12, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1626 to the McConnell, R-Ky., for Gardner, R-Colo., substitute amendment no. 1617, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2949-S2956

  • June 12, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., for Gardner, R-Colo., substitute amendment no. 1617, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S2949-S2956

  • June 12, 2020 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S2949-S2956

  • June 11, 2020Durbin, D-Ill., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.117, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S2928

  • June 11, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1632 to amendment no. 1631, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2903-2910, S2911-S2921, S2922-S2928

  • June 11, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1631 to the instructions to commit the bill, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2903-2910, S2911-S2921, S2922-S2928

  • June 11, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to commit the bill to the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee with instructions to report it back immediately with an amendment no. 1630, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2903-2910, S2911-S2921, S2922-S2928

  • June 11, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the bill (60 votes required), pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2903-2910, S2911-S2921, S2922-S2928

  • June 11, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1629 to amendment no. 1628, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2903-2910, S2911-S2921, S2922-S2928

  • June 11, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1628, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2903-2910, S2911-S2921, S2922-S2928

  • June 11, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1627 to amendment no. 1626, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2903-2910, S2911-S2921, S2922-S2928

  • June 11, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1626 to McConnell, R-Ky., for Gardner, R-Colo., substitute amendment no. 1617, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2903-2910, S2911-S2921, S2922-S2928

  • June 11, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the McConnell, R-Ky., for Gardner, R-Colo., substitute amendment no. 1617 to the bill, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2903-2910, S2911-S2921, S2922-S2928

  • June 11, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., for Gardner, R-Colo., substitute amendment no. 1617, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S2903-2910, S2911-S2921, S2922-S2928

  • June 11, 2020 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S2903-2910, S2911-S2921, S2922-S2928

  • June 11, 2020 — Paul, R-Ky., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1675. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2939, S2948

  • June 11, 2020 — Menendez, D-N.J., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1674 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2939, S2947-S2948

  • June 11, 2020 — Loeffler, R-Ga., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1673 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2939, S2947

  • June 11, 2020 — Loeffler, R-Ga., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1672 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2939, S2947

  • June 11, 2020 — Loeffler, R-Ga., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1671 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2938-S2939, S2947

  • June 11, 2020 — Shaheen, D-N.H., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1670 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2938, S2947

  • June 11, 2020 — Klobuchar, D-Minn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1669 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2938, S2946-S2947

  • June 11, 2020 — S. Brown, D-Ohio, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1668 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2938, S2946

  • June 11, 2020 — Rosen, D-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1667 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2938, S2946

  • June 11, 2020 — Murkowski, R-Alaska, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1666 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2938, S2945-S2946

  • June 11, 2020 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1665 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2938, S2944-S2945

  • June 11, 2020 — J. Reed, D-R.I., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1664 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2938, S2944

  • June 11, 2020 — Enzi, R-Wyo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1663 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2938, S2942-S2944

  • June 11, 2020 — Enzi, R-Wyo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1662 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2938, S2941-S2942

  • June 11, 2020 — Enzi, R-Wyo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1661 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2938, S2939-S2941

  • June 11, 2020 — Hoeven, R-N.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1660 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2937-S2938, S2939

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1632 to amendment no. 1631, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2853, S2853-S2859, S2861-S2872

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1631 to the instructions to commit the bill, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2853, S2853-S2859, S2861-S2872

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to commit the bill to the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee with instructions to report it back immediately with an amendment no. 1630, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2853, S2853-S2859, S2861-S2872

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the bill (60 votes required), pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2853, S2853-S2859, S2861-S2872

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1629 to amendment no. 1628, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2853, S2853-S2859, S2861-S2872

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1628, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2852-S2853, S2853-S2859, S2861-S2872

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1627 to amendment no. 1626, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2852-S2853, S2853-S2859, S2861-S2872

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment no. 1626 to McConnell, R-Ky., for Gardner, R-Colo., substitute amendment no. 1617, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2852-S2853, S2853-S2859, S2861-S2872

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the McConnell, R-Ky., for Gardner, R-Colo., substitute amendment no. 1617 to the bill, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2852-S2853, S2853-S2859, S2861-S2872

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., for Gardner, R-Colo., substitute amendment no. 1617, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S2852-S2853, S2853-S2859, S2861-S2872

  • June 10, 2020 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S2852-S2853, S2853-S2859, S2861-S2872

  • June 10, 2020Senate Vote 116 Public Land Conservation Funds — Motion to Proceed
    McConnell, R-Ky., motion to proceed to the expected legislative vehicle for a bill that would permanently fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund and establish a fund for maintenance of national parks and other public lands. Motion agreed to 79-18. Congressional Record p. S2841-S2852

  • June 10, 2020Cost Estimate issued by Congressional Budget Office.

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1631 (1630). Congressional Record p. S2880, S2889

  • June 10, 2020 — Cassidy, R-La., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1623 (1617). Congressional Record p. S2880, S2882-S2885

  • June 10, 2020 — Whitehouse, D-R.I., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1625. Congressional Record p. S2880, S2887-S2889

  • June 10, 2020 — Stabenow, D-Mich., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1624. Congressional Record p. S2880, S2885-S2887

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1627 (1626). Congressional Record p. S2880, S2889

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1626 (1617). Congressional Record p. S2880, S2889

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1629 (1628). Congressional Record p. S2880, S2889

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1628. Congressional Record p. S2880, S2889

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1630. Congressional Record p. S2880, S2889

  • June 10, 2020 — Shaheen, D-N.H., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1659. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2882, S2897

  • June 10, 2020 — Lankford, R-Okla., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1658 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2882, S2897

  • June 10, 2020 — Lankford, R-Okla., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1657 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2882, S2897

  • June 10, 2020 — Lankford, R-Okla., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1656 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2882, S2897

  • June 10, 2020 — Lankford, R-Okla., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1655 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2882, S2896-S2897

  • June 10, 2020 — Lankford, R-Okla., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1654 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2882, S2896

  • June 10, 2020 — Hirono, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1653. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2882, S2896

  • June 10, 2020 — Cruz, R-Texas, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1652 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2882, S2896

  • June 10, 2020 — Cruz, R-Texas, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1651 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2882, S2895-S2896

  • June 10, 2020 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1650 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2881-S2882, S2895

  • June 10, 2020 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1649 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2881, S2895

  • June 10, 2020 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1648 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2881, S2894-S2895

  • June 10, 2020 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1647 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2881, S2893-S2894

  • June 10, 2020 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1646 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2881, S2893

  • June 10, 2020 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1645 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2881, S2893

  • June 10, 2020 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1644 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2881, S2892-S2893

  • June 10, 2020 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1643 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2881, S2892

  • June 10, 2020 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1642 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2881, S2892

  • June 10, 2020 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1641 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2881, S2891

  • June 10, 2020 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1640 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2881, S2891

  • June 10, 2020 — M. Lee, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1639 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2880-S2881, S2891

  • June 10, 2020 — Blumenthal, D-Conn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1638 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2880, S2890-S2891

  • June 10, 2020 — Braun, R-Ind., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1637. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2880, S2890

  • June 10, 2020 — Cardin, D-Md., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1636. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2880, S2890

  • June 10, 2020 — Braun, R-Ind., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1635 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2880, S2890

  • June 10, 2020 — Rubio, R-Fla., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1633 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2880, S2889-S2890

  • June 10, 2020 — R. Johnson, R-Wis., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1634 (1617). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2880, S2890

  • June 10, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1632 (1631) (1630). Congressional Record p. S2880, S2889

  • June 9, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to proceed to the bill, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2774-S2784, S2785-S2802

  • June 9, 2020 — Cruz, R-Texas, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1622. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2834

  • June 9, 2020 — Cruz, R-Texas, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1621. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2834

  • June 9, 2020 — Feinstein, D-Calif., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1620. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2833-S2834

  • June 9, 2020 — Murkowski, R-Alaska, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1619. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2833

  • June 9, 2020 — Gardner, R-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1618. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2833

  • June 9, 2020 — Gardner, R-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1617. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2831-S2833

  • June 9, 2020 — Feinstein, D-Calif., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1616. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2831

  • June 9, 2020 — Risch, R-Idaho, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1615. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2831

  • June 9, 2020 — Lankford, R-Okla., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1614. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2831

  • June 9, 2020 — Lankford, R-Okla., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1613. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2831

  • June 9, 2020 — Hyde-Smith, R-Miss., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1612. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2831

  • June 9, 2020 — Rounds, R-S.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1611. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2831

  • June 9, 2020 — Blackburn, R-Tenn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1610. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2830-S2831

  • June 9, 2020 — Blackburn, R-Tenn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1609. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2830

  • June 9, 2020 — McSally, R-Ariz., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1608. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2830

  • June 9, 2020 — Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1607. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2821-S2830

  • June 9, 2020 — Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1606. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2821

  • June 9, 2020 — Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1605. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2820-S2821

  • June 9, 2020 — Wyden, D-Ore., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1604. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2814-S2820

  • June 9, 2020 — Cortez Masto, D-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1603. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2813-S2814

  • June 9, 2020 — Cortez Masto, D-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1602. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2813

  • June 9, 2020 — Cortez Masto, D-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1601. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2813

  • June 9, 2020 — Cortez Masto, D-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1600. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2811-S2813

  • June 9, 2020 — John Kennedy, R-La., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1599. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2811, S2811

  • June 8, 2020Senate Vote 114 Public Land Conservation Funds — Cloture
    McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the McConnell motion to proceed to the expected legislative vehicle for a bill that would permanently fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund and establish a fund for maintenance of national parks and other public lands. Motion agreed to 80-17. Note: Three-fifths of the total Senate (60) is required to invoke cloture. Congressional Record p. S2748-S2759

  • June 8, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to proceed to the bill, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2748-S2761

  • June 8, 2020 — Cassidy, R-La., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1597. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2765, S2768

  • June 8, 2020 — Baldwin, D-Wis., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1596. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2765, S2767-S2768

  • June 8, 2020 — Murray, D-Wash., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1593. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2765, S2765-S2767

  • June 8, 2020 — Barrasso, R-Wyo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1598. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2765, S2768-S2769

  • June 8, 2020 — Barrasso, R-Wyo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1595. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2765, S2767

  • June 8, 2020 — Barrasso, R-Wyo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 1594. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S2765, S2767

  • June 4, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the McConnell, R-Ky., motion to proceed to the bill, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2743

  • June 4, 2020 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to proceed to the bill, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S2743

  • May 11, 2020 — Provisions of S 3684, the 21st Century Conservation Corps for Our Health and Our Jobs Act, are included in the bill.

  • June 11, 2019 — Provisions of HR 3195, the Land and Water Conservation Fund Permanent Funding Act, are included in the bill.

  • April 29, 2019 — Placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar under the provisions of Rule XIV. Congressional Record p. S2484, S2490

  • April 11, 2019 — Taken from the desk and read the first time. Congressional Record p. S2432, S2458

  • April 10, 2019 — Received in the Senate and held at the desk. Congressional Record p. S2383

  • April 9, 2019 — Provisions of S 1081, the Land and Water Conservation Fund Permanent Funding Act, are included in the bill.

  • April 9, 2019 — Measure, as amended, passed in the House by voice vote, under suspension of the rules (two-thirds vote required). Congressional Record p. H3166

  • April 9, 2019 — Lewis, D-Ga., motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended, agreed to by voice vote. Congressional Record p. H3151-H3166

  • April 9, 2019 — House Financial Services Committee discharged by unanimous consent. Congressional Record p. H3215

  • April 9, 2019 — Reported to the House amended by the House Ways and Means Committee and placed on the Union Calendar. H Rept 116-39, Pt. 1Congressional Record p. H3215

  • April 8, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 12

    Buchanan, (R-Fla.)Gomez, (D-Calif.)Larson, J. (D-Conn.)
    Cisneros, (D-Calif.)Higgins, B. (D-N.Y.)Murphy, S. (D-Fla.)
    Davis, D. (D-Ill.)Holding, (R-N.C.)Sewell, (D-Ala.)
    Evans, (D-Pa.)Horsford, (D-Nev.)Taylor, V. (R-Texas)
  • April 4, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Norton, (D-D.C.)Watkins, (R-Kan.)
  • April 3, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Fitzpatrick, (R-Pa.)Schneider, (D-Ill.)
  • April 2, 2019 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Ways and Means Committee.

    April 2, 2019 — Committee Vote: IRS Modernization — Substitute Amendment
      Neal, D-Mass. —

    Substitute amendment that would make technical changes to correct a clerical error.

    Substitute amendment that would make technical changes to correct a clerical error.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    April 2, 2019 — Committee Vote: IRS Modernization — Vote to Report

    Codify the requirement for an independent administrative appeals function at the IRS and establish the Independent Office of Appeals. It would provide for notice and protest procedures as well as additional congressional oversight for taxpayers precluded from using the administrative-review process.

    It would require the IRS commissioner to appoint a chief of appeals to oversee the Independent Office of Appeals. It would require the chief to have experience in a broad range of federal tax law controversies and management of large service organizations. It also would require the IRS to provide certain individual and business taxpayers with their case files, if requested, prior to the start of any dispute resolution process.

    It also would requires the IRS, within one year of the bill's enactment, to develop and submit to Congress a comprehensive customer service strategy that would establish metrics and benchmarks for measuring the agency's success in implementing the strategy.

    It also would require the IRS to continue to work with private stakeholders to maintain, improve, and expand the Free File program. It also would require Free File program members to continue to provide basic fillable forms to all taxpayers.

    It also would codify the existing low-income exception with respect to any user fee or upfront partial payment imposed with respect to any offer-in-compromise agreement with a taxpayer to settle the taxpayer's tax debt.

    The bill also would require the IRS to show probable cause that funds believed to have been structured to avoid the $10,000 reporting threshold are derived from an illegal source or are connected to another criminal activity. It also would provide procedural protections for individuals, including a post-seizure hearing within 30 days of the seizure.

    It also would exempt from income tax any interest paid on funds seized by the IRS on allegations of structuring transactions to avoid the $10,000 threshold and ordered by a court to be returned to an individual.

    It also would clarify the jurisdiction of the U.S. Tax Court to determine equitable relief for certain innocent spouses from joint tax liability and that the IRS has the authority to issue "John Doe" summonses, requiring that such a summons be narrowly tailored to seek only information that pertains to the failure or potential failure of the person or group of persons to comply with federal tax law.

    It also would add to the types of cases that cannot be referred to private collection agencies those involving a taxpayer whose income is substantially derived from supplemental security income benefits or disability insurance benefit payments and taxpayers with an adjusted gross income of 200 percent of the applicable
    poverty level and below. It would define inactive tax receivables that can be assigned to private debt collection agencies as those in which more than two years have passed since assessment of the tax debt.

    It also would require the IRS to provide notice to taxpayers before contacting third parties, including friends, neighbors and clients, at least 45 days prior to the period of contact, which may not be greater than one year.

    It also would require that prior to issuing a designated summons, to examine the tax liability of certain corporations, the commissioner of the relevant operating division of the IRS and the chief counsel must review and provide written approval of the summons. It would require the written approval to state facts establishing that the IRS had previously made reasonable requests for the information and that such information be attached to the summons.

    It also would prohibit a person, other than an officer or employee of the IRS, from examining books and records as part of an examination other than for the sole purpose of serving as an expert.

    It also would require a response from the IRS commissioner or deputy commissioner to a taxpayer advocate directive from the national taxpayer advocate mandating changes to IRS administration or other processes and clarifying the time period for a response.

    It also would requires the Treasury secretary or a delegate to submit to Congress a comprehensive written plan to redesign the organization of the IRS no later than Sept. 30, 2020.

    It also would permanently authorize the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program's matching grant program to support maintenance and expansion of programs to provide free tax return filing assistance to low-income populations, persons with disabilities, taxpayers with limited English proficiency, and other underserved communities. It also would allow the Treasury secretary, unless otherwise provided a specific appropriation, to allocate from otherwise appropriated funds up to $30 million per year for the matching grant program.

    It also would clarify that IRS employees are able to provide information regarding the availability of and eligibility requirements for taxpayers in need of representation from low-income taxpayer clinics in controversies with the IRS.

    It also would require the IRS to provide public notice, including by non-electronic means, to affected taxpayers 90 days prior to the closure of a taxpayer assistance center.

    It also would requires the IRS to provide the following information over the telephone while taxpayers are on hold with an IRS call center: information about common tax scams, information on where and how to report such activity, and tips on how to protect against identity theft and tax scams.

    The measure also would bar the IRS from providing taxpayer information to any contractors or other agents of a federal, state or local agency unless the contractor has safeguards in place to protect the confidentiality of return information and agrees to conduct on-site compliance reviews every three years.

    It also would require the Treasury secretary, in coordination with the Bureau of Fiscal Service and the IRS, to submit a report to Congress, within two years of the bill's enactment, outlining how the government can use new payment platforms to increase the use of electronic funds transfers for tax refunds.

    It also would require the IRS to set up a program under which any concerned taxpayer can request an identity protection personal identification number (IP PIN) to use in filing his or her return. The bill also would expand voluntary access to IP PINs nationwide over five years.

    It also would establish a single point of contact within the IRS for any taxpayer who is a victim of identity theft.

    The legislation also would require the IRS to notify a taxpayer: if there has been any suspected unauthorized use of the taxpayer's identity or that of the taxpayer's dependents; if an investigation has been initiated and its status; whether the investigation substantiated any unauthorized use of the taxpayer's identity; and whether any action has been taken, such as a referral for prosecution. Also, if an individual is charged with a crime, it would require the IRS to notify the victim as soon as possible, giving such victims the ability to pursue civil action against the perpetrator.

    It also would impose increased monetary penalties for the disclosure of taxpayer identity information by a return preparer in cases where such information is used in an identity theft crime, whether or not related to the filing of a tax return.

    It also would codify the position of the IRS chief information officer and establish roles and responsibilities for the CIO. It also would mandates that the IRS develop and implement an IT strategic plan. It also would require the IRS to finish its plans for the completion of the Customer Account Data Engine (CADE 2) and have a third party independently verify and validate planning for CADE 2 and Enterprise Case Management system(s) generally within a year of the bill's enactment.

    It also would require the IRS to develop an internet portal that facilitates taxpayers filing Form 1099 with the IRS. It would require that the website provide taxpayers with access to resources and guidance provided by the IRS, and to allow taxpayers to prepare, file and distribute Form 1099, and create and maintain taxpayer records.

    It also would allow the IRS to use its streamlined critical pay authority with respect to information technology positions.

    It also would authorize the IRS to develop an automated system to receive forms requesting third-party income verification through the IRS' Income Verification Express Service in lieu of the current system, which relies on the forms to be sent to the IRS via secure fax. It also would authorize the IRS to charge a separate user fee over a two-year period on all IVES requests to fund the development of the new system.

    The bill also would allow the IRS to require electronic filing of returns by individuals or partnerships filing 10 or more returns. Currently the threshold is 250.

    It also would require the IRS to publish regulations and other guidelines that would allow for electronic signatures to be used to request taxpayer return information for the purposes of disclosures to a practitioner or to execute a power of attorney.

    It also would allow the IRS to directly accept credit and debit card payments for taxes, provided that the fee is paid by the taxpayer. It would direct the IRS to seek to minimize these fees when entering into contracts to process credit and debit cards.

    It also would require the IRS to verify the identity of any individual opening an e-Services account before he or she is able to use such services.

    It also would direct the IRS to submit to Congress a comprehensive training strategy to streamline current training processes, develop annual training on taxpayer rights, improve technology-based training, and better focus on fair resolution of taxpayer disputes.

    It also would prohibit the rehiring any IRS employee who has been involuntarily separated for misconduct.

    It also would require notification of a taxpayer if any disciplinary or adverse action is taken against an IRS employee or employee of any other federal or state agency for unauthorized inspection or disclosure with respect to the taxpayer's information.

    It also would extend the requirement to file electronically to all tax-exempt organizations required to file statements or returns in the Form 990 series or Form 8872 (Political Organization Report of Contributions and Expenditures). The provision also would require that the IRS make the information provided on the forms available to the public as soon as practicable in a machine-readable format.

    It also would require the IRS to notify a nonprofit organization after the organization's second consecutive failure to file an information return in order to give the organization time to file an information return and prevent their tax-exempt status from being revoked.

    It also would increase to $330 the penalty for failure to file a tax return.

    Codify the requirement for an independent administrative appeals function at the IRS and establish the Independent Office of Appeals. It would provide for notice and protest procedures as well as additional congressional oversight for taxpayers precluded from using the administrative-review process.

    It would require the IRS commissioner to appoint a chief of appeals to oversee the Independent Office of Appeals. It would require the chief to have experience in a broad range of federal tax law controversies and management of large service organizations. It also would require the IRS to provide certain individual and business taxpayers with their case files, if requested, prior to the start of any dispute resolution process.

    It also would requires the IRS, within one year of the bill's enactment, to develop and submit to Congress a comprehensive customer service strategy that would establish metrics and benchmarks for measuring the agency's success in implementing the strategy.

    It also would require the IRS to continue to work with private stakeholders to maintain, improve, and expand the Free File program. It also would require Free File program members to continue to provide basic fillable forms to all taxpayers.

    It also would codify the existing low-income exception with respect to any user fee or upfront partial payment imposed with respect to any offer-in-compromise agreement with a taxpayer to settle the taxpayer's tax debt.

    The bill also would require the IRS to show probable cause that funds believed to have been structured to avoid the $10,000 reporting threshold are derived from an illegal source or are connected to another criminal activity. It also would provide procedural protections for individuals, including a post-seizure hearing within 30 days of the seizure.

    It also would exempt from income tax any interest paid on funds seized by the IRS on allegations of structuring transactions to avoid the $10,000 threshold and ordered by a court to be returned to an individual.

    It also would clarify the jurisdiction of the U.S. Tax Court to determine equitable relief for certain innocent spouses from joint tax liability and that the IRS has the authority to issue "John Doe" summonses, requiring that such a summons be narrowly tailored to seek only information that pertains to the failure or potential failure of the person or group of persons to comply with federal tax law.

    It also would add to the types of cases that cannot be referred to private collection agencies those involving a taxpayer whose income is substantially derived from supplemental security income benefits or disability insurance benefit payments and taxpayers with an adjusted gross income of 200 percent of the applicable poverty level and below. It would define inactive tax receivables that can be assigned to private debt collection agencies as those in which more than two years have passed since assessment of the tax debt.

    It also would require the IRS to provide notice to taxpayers before contacting third parties, including friends, neighbors and clients, at least 45 days prior to the period of contact, which may not be greater than one year.

    It also would require that prior to issuing a designated summons, to examine the tax liability of certain corporations, the commissioner of the relevant operating division of the IRS and the chief counsel must review and provide written approval of the summons. It would require the written approval to state facts establishing that the IRS had previously made reasonable requests for the information and that such information be attached to the summons.

    It also would prohibit a person, other than an officer or employee of the IRS, from examining books and records as part of an examination other than for the sole purpose of serving as an expert.

    It also would require a response from the IRS commissioner or deputy commissioner to a taxpayer advocate directive from the national taxpayer advocate mandating changes to IRS administration or other processes and clarifying the time period for a response.

    It also would requires the Treasury secretary or a delegate to submit to Congress a comprehensive written plan to redesign the organization of the IRS no later than Sept. 30, 2020.

    It also would permanently authorize the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program's matching grant program to support maintenance and expansion of programs to provide free tax return filing assistance to low-income populations, persons with disabilities, taxpayers with limited English proficiency, and other underserved communities. It also would allow the Treasury secretary, unless otherwise provided a specific appropriation, to allocate from otherwise appropriated funds up to $30 million per year for the matching grant program.

    It also would clarify that IRS employees are able to provide information regarding the availability of and eligibility requirements for taxpayers in need of representation from low-income taxpayer clinics in controversies with the IRS.

    It also would require the IRS to provide public notice, including by non-electronic means, to affected taxpayers 90 days prior to the closure of a taxpayer assistance center.

    It also would requires the IRS to provide the following information over the telephone while taxpayers are on hold with an IRS call center: information about common tax scams, information on where and how to report such activity, and tips on how to protect against identity theft and tax scams.

    The measure also would bar the IRS from providing taxpayer information to any contractors or other agents of a federal, state or local agency unless the contractor has safeguards in place to protect the confidentiality of return information and agrees to conduct on-site compliance reviews every three years. It also would require the Treasury secretary, in coordination with the Bureau of Fiscal Service and the IRS, to submit a report to Congress, within two years of the bill's enactment, outlining how the government can use new payment platforms to increase the use of electronic funds transfers for tax refunds.

    It also would require the IRS to set up a program under which any concerned taxpayer can request an identity protection personal identification number (IP PIN) to use in filing his or her return. The bill also would expand voluntary access to IP PINs nationwide over five years.

    It also would establish a single point of contact within the IRS for any taxpayer who is a victim of identity theft.

    The legislation also would require the IRS to notify a taxpayer: if there has been any suspected unauthorized use of the taxpayer's identity or that of the taxpayer's dependents; if an investigation has been initiated and its status; whether the investigation substantiated any unauthorized use of the taxpayer's identity; and whether any action has been taken, such as a referral for prosecution. Also, if an individual is charged with a crime, it would require the IRS to notify the victim as soon as possible, giving such victims the ability to pursue civil action against the perpetrator.

    It also would impose increased monetary penalties for the disclosure of taxpayer identity information by a return preparer in cases where such information is used in an identity theft crime, whether or not related to the filing of a tax return.

    It also would codify the position of the IRS chief information officer and establish roles and responsibilities for the CIO. It also would mandates that the IRS develop and implement an IT strategic plan. It also would require the IRS to finish its plans for the completion of the Customer Account Data Engine (CADE 2) and have a third party independently verify and validate planning for CADE 2 and Enterprise Case Management system(s) generally within a year of the bill's enactment.

    It also would require the IRS to develop an internet portal that facilitates taxpayers filing Form 1099 with the IRS. It would require that the website provide taxpayers with access to resources and guidance provided by the IRS, and to allow taxpayers to prepare, file and distribute Form 1099, and create and maintain taxpayer records.

    It also would allow the IRS to use its streamlined critical pay authority with respect to information technology positions.

    It also would authorize the IRS to develop an automated system to receive forms requesting third-party income verification through the IRS' Income Verification Express Service in lieu of the current system, which relies on the forms to be sent to the IRS via secure fax. It also would authorize the IRS to charge a separate user fee over a two-year period on all IVES requests to fund the development of the new system.

    The bill also would allow the IRS to require electronic filing of returns by individuals or partnerships filing 10 or more returns. Currently the threshold is 250.

    It also would require the IRS to publish regulations and other guidelines that would allow for electronic signatures to be used to request taxpayer return information for the purposes of disclosures to a practitioner or to execute a power of attorney.

    It also would allow the IRS to directly accept credit and debit card payments for taxes, provided that the fee is paid by the taxpayer. It would direct the IRS to seek to minimize these fees when entering into contracts to process credit and debit cards.

    It also would require the IRS to verify the identity of any individual opening an e-Services account before he or she is able to use such services. It also would direct the IRS to submit to Congress a comprehensive training strategy to streamline current training processes, develop annual training on taxpayer rights, improve technology-based training, and better focus on fair resolution of taxpayer disputes.

    It also would prohibit the rehiring any IRS employee who has been involuntarily separated for misconduct.

    It also would require notification of a taxpayer if any disciplinary or adverse action is taken against an IRS employee or employee of any other federal or state agency for unauthorized inspection or disclosure with respect to the taxpayer's information.

    It also would extend the requirement to file electronically to all tax-exempt organizations required to file statements or returns in the Form 990 series or Form 8872 (Political Organization Report of Contributions and Expenditures). The provision also would require that the IRS make the information provided on the forms available to the public as soon as practicable in a machine-readable format.

    It also would require the IRS to notify a nonprofit organization after the organization's second consecutive failure to file an information return in order to give the organization time to file an information return and prevent their tax-exempt status from being revoked.

    It also would increase to $330 the penalty for failure to file a tax return.

    Ordered reported favorably to the full House (as amended) by voice vote.
  • March 28, 2019 — Original cosponsor(s): 12

    Boyle, (D-Pa.)Kelly, M. (R-Pa.)Sanchez, (D-Calif.)
    Brady, K. (R-Texas)LaHood, (R-Ill.)Suozzi, (D-N.Y.)
    Chu, (D-Calif.)Moore, (D-Wis.)Walorski, (R-Ind.)
    DelBene, (D-Wash.)Neal, (D-Mass.)Wenstrup, (R-Ohio)
  • March 28, 2019 — Read twice and referred to: House Financial Services, House Ways and Means.Congressional Record p. H2915