California - SB270

Public employment: labor relations: employee information.

Introduced

January 28, 2021

Description

<div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify; margin: 0px 0px 1em;">Existing law, including the Meyers-Milias-Brown Act, the Ralph C. Dills Act, the Trial Court Employment Protection and Governance Act, the Trial Court Interpreter Employment and Labor Relations Act, and the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority Transit Employer-Employee Relations Act, provisions commonly referred to as the Educational Employment Relations Act, and the Higher Education Employer-Employee Relations Act, among others, regulates the labor relations of the state, the courts, and specified local public agencies and their employees.</div>

<div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify; margin: 0px 0px 1em;">Existing law requires these public employers to provide certain labor representatives with the names and home addresses of newly hired employees, as well as their job titles, departments, work locations, telephone numbers, and personal email addresses, within 30 days of hire or by the first pay period of the month following hire. Existing law also requires the public employers to provide this information for all employees in a bargaining unit at least every 120 days, except as specified. Existing law requires the Public Employment Relations Board to have jurisdiction over violations of these requirements and to have certain powers and duties related to enforcement of these requirements, except as specified.</div>

<div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify; margin: 0px 0px 1em;">This bill, commencing July 1, 2022, would authorize an exclusive representative to file a charge of an unfair labor practice with the board, as specified, alleging a violation of the above-described requirements only if specified conditions are met, including that the exclusive representative gives written notice of the alleged violation and that the public employer fails to cure the violation, as specified. The bill would limit a public employer&rsquo;s opportunity to cure certain violations.</div>

<div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: justify; margin: 0px 0px 1em;">This bill would subject a violator to a penalty, not to exceed $10,000, to be determined by the board based on specified criteria, and would require the penalty to be deposited in the General Fund. The bill would require the board to award a party who prevails in these circumstances specified attorney&rsquo;s fees and costs.</div>

Our Position

Oppose

Commentary

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Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 0

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