Federal - HR 2376

A bill to require the Federal Trade Commission to study the role of intermediaries in the pharmaceutical supply chain and provide Congress with appropriate policy recommendations, and for other purposes.

Introduced

April 29, 2019

Description

A bill to require the Federal Trade Commission to study the role of intermediaries in the pharmaceutical supply chain and provide Congress with appropriate policy recommendations, and for other purposes.

Our Position

Monitoring

Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 7

Latest Actions See More/Less

  • Sept. 18, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Pocan, (D-Wis.)
  • July 10, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Porter, (D-Calif.)
  • May 7, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Neguse, (D-Colo.)Rose, (D-N.Y.)
  • May 1, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Cohen, (D-Tenn.)Meadows, (R-N.C.)
  • April 30, 2019 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Judiciary Committee.

    April 30, 2019 — Committee Vote: Pharmacy Benefit Managers Report — Vote to Report

    Require the Federal Trade Commission, within one year of the bill's enactment, to submit to the appropriate congressional committees, a report that addresses whether pharmacy benefit mangers charge payers a higher price than the reimbursement rate that the pharmacy benefit managers reimburse competing pharmacies.

    The bill also would require the FTC to address in the report whether pharmacy benefit managers steer patients for anti-competitive purposes to any pharmacies, including retail and mail-order, and use formulary designs to increase the market share of higher cost prescription drugs.

    It also would require the FTC to include in the report any specific legal or regulatory obstacles the commission currently faces in ensuring a competitive and transparent marketplace in the pharmaceutical supply chain.

    It also would require the FTC to include in the report any policy or legislative recommendations to improve transparency and competition in the pharmaceutical supply chain and how best to ensure that consumers benefit from any cost savings or efficiencies that may result from mergers and consolidations.

    It also would require the FTC, within 180 days of the bill's enactment, to submit to the appropriate congressional committees an interim report on the progress of the report required by the legislation.

    Require the Federal Trade Commission, within one year of the bill's enactment, to submit to the appropriate congressional committees, a report that addresses whether pharmacy benefit mangers charge payers a higher price than the reimbursement rate that the pharmacy benefit managers reimburse competing pharmacies.

    The bill also would require the FTC to address in the report whether pharmacy benefit managers steer patients for anti-competitive purposes to any pharmacies, including retail and mail-order, and use formulary designs to increase the market share of higher cost prescription drugs.

    It also would require the FTC to include in the report any specific legal or regulatory obstacles the commission currently faces in ensuring a competitive and transparent marketplace in the pharmaceutical supply chain.

    It also would require the FTC to include in the report any policy or legislative recommendations to improve transparency and competition in the pharmaceutical supply chain and how best to ensure that consumers benefit from any cost savings or efficiencies that may result from mergers and consolidations.

    It also would require the FTC, within 180 days of the bill's enactment, to submit to the appropriate congressional committees an interim report on the progress of the report required by the legislation.

    Ordered reported favorably to the full House by voice vote.
  • April 29, 2019 — Original cosponsor(s): 1

    Nadler, (D-N.Y.)
  • April 29, 2019 — Read twice and referred to: House Energy and Commerce, House Judiciary.Congressional Record p. H3302