Federal - S 2577

Justice for All Act

Introduced

February 24, 2016

Description

A bill to protect crime victims' rights, to eliminate the substantial backlog of DNA and other forensic evidence samples to improve and expand the forensic science testing capacity of Federal, State, and local crime laboratories, to increase research and development of new testing technologies, to develop new training programs regarding the collection and use of forensic evidence, to provide post-conviction testing of DNA evidence to exonerate the innocent, to support accreditation efforts of forensic science laboratories and medical examiner offices, to address training and equipment needs, to improve the performance of counsel in State capital cases, and for other purposes.

Our Position

Support

Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 17

Latest Actions See More/Less

  • Dec. 16, 2016 — Became Public Law, PL 114-324, 130 Stat. 1948.

  • Dec. 16, 2016 — Signed by the president. Congressional Record p. H7633

  • Dec. 6, 2016 — Enrolled measure signed in the Senate. Congressional Record p. S6757

  • Dec. 6, 2016 — Enrolled measure signed in the House. Congressional Record p. H7270

  • Dec. 1, 2016 — Measure cleared for the president. Congressional Record p. S6679

  • Dec. 1, 2016 — Measure passed in the Senate via motion to concur by unanimous consent. Congressional Record p. S6679

  • Dec. 1, 2016 — Sullivan, R-Alaska, motion to concur in the House amendment to the bill, agreed to by unanimous consent. Congressional Record p. S6679

  • Dec. 1, 2016 — House amendment to the bill considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S6679

  • Dec. 1, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Murray, (D-Wash.)
  • Nov. 29, 2016 — Measure, as amended, passed in the House by voice vote, under suspension of the rules (two-thirds vote required). Congressional Record p. H6329

  • Nov. 29, 2016 — Goodlatte, R-Va., motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended, agreed to by voice vote. Congressional Record p. H6322-H6329

  • June 20, 2016 — Received in the House and referred to the House Judiciary Committee and the House Financial Services Committee. Congressional Record p. H3971-H3972

  • June 16, 2016 — Measure, as amended, passed in the Senate by voice vote. Congressional Record p. S4271

  • June 16, 2016 — Cornyn, R-Texas, for Grassley, R-Iowa, amendment no. 4727, adopted by unanimous consent. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S4270

  • June 16, 2016 — Senate Judiciary Committee-reported amendments adopted by unanimous consent. Congressional Record p. S4270

  • June 16, 2016 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S4266-S4271

  • June 16, 2016 — Cornyn, R-Texas, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 4727. Congressional Record p. S4306, S4308-S4309

  • May 18, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Blunt, (R-Mo.)Gillibrand, (D-N.Y.)
  • May 16, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Burr, (R-N.C.)Coons, (D-Del.)
  • May 12, 2016 — Reported to the Senate amended and without a written report by the Senate Judiciary Committee and placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar. Congressional Record p. S2748

  • May 12, 2016 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the Senate Judiciary Committee.

    May 12, 2016 — Committee Vote: Crime Victim Restitution Revisions — Manager's Amendment
      Cornyn, R-Texas —

    Manager's amendment that would require Government Accountability Office to conduct a study to determine whether providing courts with broader authority to award restitution for federal offenses would be beneficial to crime victims and what factors Congress should consider in weighing such changes.

    The study would consider if restitution should apply to victims who have suffered harm, injury or loss that would not have otherwise occurred, to allow courts to use discretion in awarding appropriate sums to reflect income lost by the victim's family members or estate as a result of a victim's death, to require the defendant to pay victims court-determined amounts to restore the victim to their previous position and to require the defendant to compensate victims for any injury, harm or loss, including emotion distress, as a result of the offense. The study would have to be completed 180 days after the bill's enactment.

    The amendment also would require the attorney general to evaluate each Justice Department office in seeking and recovering victim restitution.

    One year after the bill's enactment, it also require the U.S. comptroller to issue a report on expanded restitution sought by the U.S. attorney general and submit it to congressional Judiciary committees. The report would include:

    • the number of cases in which a defendant was convicted and the attorney general could seek restitution and the number of cases in which the attorney general sought restitution.
    • the number of the cases in which the attorney general sought restitution and the number of times restitution was ordered by U.S. district courts.
    • the percentage of restitution orders for which the full amount of restitution has not been collected.

    The report would also have to include best practices for requesting restitution, obtaining and collecting restitution orders from district courts.

    Manager's amendment that would require Government Accountability Office to conduct a study to determine whether providing courts with broader authority to award restitution for federal offenses would be beneficial to crime victims and what factors Congress should consider in weighing such changes.

    The study would consider if restitution should apply to victims who have suffered harm, injury or loss that would not have otherwise occurred, to allow courts to use discretion in awarding appropriate sums to reflect income lost by the victim's family members or estate as a result of a victim's death, to require the defendant to pay victims court-determined amounts to restore the victim to their previous position and to require the defendant to compensate victims for any injury, harm or loss, including emotion distress, as a result of the offense. The study would have to be completed 180 days after the bill's enactment.

    The amendment also would require the attorney general to evaluate each Justice Department office in seeking and recovering victim restitution.

    One year after the bill's enactment, it also require the U.S. comptroller to issue a report on expanded restitution sought by the U.S. attorney general and submit it to congressional Judiciary committees. The report would include:

    • the number of cases in which a defendant was convicted and the attorney general could seek restitution and the number of cases in which the attorney general sought restitution.
    • the number of the cases in which the attorney general sought restitution and the number of times restitution was ordered by U.S. district courts.
    • the percentage of restitution orders for which the full amount of restitution has not been collected.
    • The report would also have to include best practices for requesting restitution, obtaining and collecting restitution orders from district courts.

      Adopted by voice vote.

  • May 11, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Feinstein, (D-Calif.)
  • April 28, 2016Consideration and markup deferred by the Senate Judiciary Committee.

  • April 18, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Hatch, (R-Utah)Shaheen, (D-N.H.)
  • April 13, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Collins, S. (R-Maine)Warner, M. (D-Va.)
  • March 15, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 4

    Heller, (R-Nev.)Portman, (R-Ohio)
    Klobuchar, (D-Minn.)Udall, (D-N.M.)
  • Feb. 24, 2016 — Original cosponsor(s): 3

    Ayotte, (R-N.H.)Durbin, (D-Ill.)Leahy, (D-Vt.)
  • Feb. 24, 2016 — Read twice and referred to: Senate Judiciary.Congressional Record p. S994