Federal - S 524

Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act

Introduced

February 12, 2015

Description

A bill to authorize the Attorney General to award grants to address the national epidemics of prescription opioid abuse and heroin use.

Our Position

Support

Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 44

Latest Actions See More/Less

  • July 26, 2016 — Became Public Law, PL 114-198, 130 Stat. 695. Congressional Record p. D876

  • July 22, 2016 — Signed by the president. Congressional Record p. H6150

  • July 14, 2016M. Turner, R-Ohio, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.399, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1139

  • July 14, 2016M. Turner, R-Ohio, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.388, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1139

  • July 14, 2016M. Turner, R-Ohio, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.387, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1139

  • July 14, 2016 — Enrolled measure signed in the Senate. Congressional Record p. S5150

  • July 14, 2016 — Enrolled measure signed in the House. Congressional Record p. H5002

  • July 13, 2016 — Measure cleared for the president. Congressional Record p. S5066

  • July 13, 2016Senate Vote 129 Opioid Abuse Treatment and Prevention — Conference Report
    Adoption of the conference report on the bill that would authorize $103 million annually through fiscal 2021 for the Justice Department to award grants to state, local and tribal governments to provide services relating to opioid abuse, including first-responder training for opioid overdose reversal drugs and treatment alternatives to incarceration programs. The conference report also would modify rules regarding administration of medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction, including by allowing certain nurses and physicians assistants to provide such services, and would allow prescriptions for drugs under Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act to be partially filled. It also would establish a Health and Human Services Department grant program for states to encourage pharmacies to dispense opioid overdose reversal drugs pursuant to a "standing order," which permits pharmacists to dispense medication without a person-specific prescription. The measure also would require the Veterans Affairs Department (VA) to more closely track opioid use by veterans in the VA health care system and to expand an opioid safety initiative at VA medical facilities. Adopted (thus cleared for the president) 92-2. Congressional Record p. S5066

  • July 13, 2016Senate Vote 126 Opioid Abuse Treatment and Prevention — Cloture
    Motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the conference report on the bill that would authorize $103 million annually through fiscal 2021 for the Justice Department to award grants to state, local and tribal governments to provide services relating to opioid abuse. The conference report also would modify rules regarding administration of medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction, including by allowing certain nurses and physicians assistants to provide such services. It also would establish a Health and Human Services Department grant program for states to encourage pharmacies to dispense opioid overdose reversal drugs pursuant to a "standing order," which permits pharmacists to dispense medication without a person-specific prescription. Motion agreed to 90-2. Note: Three-fifths of the total Senate (60) is required to invoke cloture. Congressional Record p. S5022-S5028

  • July 13, 2016 — Conference report considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S5022- S5028, S5045-S5066

  • July 12, 2016 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the conference report to accompany the bill (60 votes required), pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S4955-S4968, S4975-S4993

  • July 12, 2016 — Conference report considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S4955-S4962, S4975-S4993

  • July 12, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Alexander, (R-Tenn.)
  • July 11, 2016 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the conference report to accompany the bill (60 votes required), pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S4926-S4941

  • July 11, 2016 — Conference report considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S4926-S4929

  • July 8, 2016Hurt, R-Va., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.399, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H4561

  • July 8, 2016Brat, R-Va., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.399, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H4561

  • July 8, 2016G. Green, D-Texas, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.399, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H4561

  • July 8, 2016Bost, R-Ill., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.388, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1073

  • July 8, 2016Bost, R-Ill., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.387, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1073

  • July 8, 2016House Vote 399 Opioid Abuse Treatment and Prevention — Conference Report
    Adoption of the conference report on the bill that would authorize $103 million to the Justice Department each year through fiscal 2021 to award grants to state, local and tribal governments to provide services relating to opioid abuse, including first-responder training for opioid overdose reversal drugs and treatment alternatives to incarceration programs. The measure would create several new opioid treatment programs within the Health and Human Services Department, including state demonstration grants for comprehensive opioid abuse response and grants to recovery community organizations. The measure would require the Food and Drug Administration to seek recommendations from an advisory committee before approving the use of new opioid drugs. The measure would require Medicare prescription drug plans to develop a drug management program to limit access for beneficiaries who are at risk of abuse. The measure would also require the VA to more closely track opioid use by veterans within the VA health care system and to expand its opioid safety initiative at VA medical facilities. Adopted (thus sent to the Senate) 407-5. Congressional Record p. H4561

  • July 8, 2016 — Conference report considered by the House. Congressional Record p. H4554-H4561

  • July 7, 2016House Vote 388 Opioid Abuse and NDAA — Rule
    Adoption of the rule (H Res 809) that would provide for House floor consideration of the conference report to accompany the opioid measure (S 524) and would authorize a motion to go to conference on the fiscal 2017 National Defense Authorization Act (S 2943). Adopted 243-177. Congressional Record p. H4523

  • July 7, 2016House Vote 387 Opioid Abuse and NDAA — Previous Question
    Polis, D-Colo., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 809) that would provide for House floor consideration of the conference report to accompany the opioid measure (S 524) and would authorize a motion to go to conference on the fiscal 2017 National Defense Authorization Act (S 2943). Motion agreed to 244-179. Congressional Record p. H4496-H4497, H4522-H4523

  • July 7, 2016 — Rules Committee resolution, H Res 809, reported to the House as a rule for the conference report to accompany S 524.

  • July 7, 2016 — House Rules Committee granted a rule providing for consideration of the conference report to accompany the bill. (In the legislative day that began on July 6, 2016.) Congressional Record p. H4460, H4465

  • July 6, 2016 — Conference report filed in the House. H Rept 114-669Congressional Record p. H4392, H4465

  • July 6, 2016 — Full committee proceeding held by the House Rules Committee.

  • July 6, 2016 — Conference committee proceeding held by House and Senate conferees.

  • July 5, 2016Cost Estimate issued by Congressional Budget Office.

  • July 5, 2016Draft bill text released by

  • June 20, 2016Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.102, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S4354-S4355

  • June 20, 2016Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.101, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S4354-S4355

  • June 20, 2016Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.100, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S4354-S4355

  • June 16, 2016Rubio, R-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.100, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S4283

  • June 16, 2016Senate Vote 102 Opioid Abuse Prevention and Treatment — Motion to Instruct
    Whitehouse, D-R.I., motion to instruct conferees to reject proposals that would replace the individual prevention, treatment, law enforcement, and recovery programs with a single grant program with multiple allowable uses. Additionally, the motion would instruct conferees to insist: that the final conference report include authorizations explicitly designated for grants to states, address the unique needs of rural communities, and that the provisions of the Jason Simcakoski Memorial Opioid Safety Act and the Recovery Enhancement for Addiction Treatment Act be included in the conference report. The bill would authorize federal grants to states, local governments and nonprofit organizations to prevent and treat opioid abuse. Motion agreed to 70-24. Congressional Record p. S4284-S4285

  • June 16, 2016Senate Vote 101 Opioid Abuse Prevention and Treatment — Motion to Instruct
    Shaheen, D-N.H., motion to instruct conferees to insist that the final conference report include funding for prevention, treatment and recovery associate with state and local efforts needed to combat the national heroin and opioid epidemic. The bill would authorize federal grants to states, local governments and nonprofit organizations to prevent and treat opioid abuse. Motion agreed to 66-29. Congressional Record p. S4284

  • June 16, 2016 — Senate conferees named: Grassley, R-Iowa, Alexander, R-Tenn., Hatch, R-Utah, Sessions, R-Ala., Leahy, D-Vt., Cornyn, R-Texas, Murray, D-Wash., Wyden, D-Ore. Congressional Record p. S4277-S4284

  • June 16, 2016Senate Vote 100 Opioid Abuse Prevention and Treatment — Cloture
    Motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the McConnell, R-Ky., motion that the Senate disagree with the House amendment, agree to the House's request that the two chambers go to conference, and that the Senate appoint as conferees: Grassley, R-Iowa, Alexander, R-Tenn., Hatch, R-Utah, Sessions, R-Ala., Leahy, D-Vt., Cornyn, R-Texas, Murray, D-Wash., Wyden, D-Ore. The bill would authorize federal grants to states, local governments and nonprofit organizations to prevent and treat opioid abuse. Motion agreed to 95-1. Note: Three-fifths of the total Senate (60) is required to invoke cloture. Congressional Record p. S4277-S4284

  • June 16, 2016 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to disagree with the House amendment, agree to the House's request that the two chambers go to conference, and that the Senate appoint the following members as conferees: Grassley, R-Iowa, Alexander, R-Tenn., Hatch, R-Utah, Sessions, R-Ala., Leahy, D-Vt., Cornyn, R-Texas, Murray, D-Wash., Wyden, D-Ore., agreed to by voice vote. Congressional Record p. S4277-S4284

  • June 16, 2016 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S4277-S4284

  • May 24, 2016Hinojosa, D-Texas, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.198, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E779

  • May 18, 2016Pascrell, D-N.J., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.191, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E737

  • May 18, 2016Pascrell, D-N.J., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.193, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E737

  • May 18, 2016Pascrell, D-N.J., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.190, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E737

  • May 18, 2016Curbelo, R-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.198, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E735

  • May 18, 2016Latta, R-Ohio, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.193, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E735

  • May 18, 2016Latta, R-Ohio, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.191, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E735

  • May 18, 2016Latta, R-Ohio, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.190, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E735

  • May 18, 2016Crawford, R-Ark., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.198, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E733

  • May 17, 2016 — House conferees named: Upton, R-Mich., Pitts, R-Pa., Lance, R-N.J., Guthrie, R-Ky., Kinzinger, R-Ill., Bucshon, R-Ind., Brooks, R-Ind., Goodlatte, R-Va., Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., Smith, R-Texas, Marino, R-Pa., Collins, R-Ga., Trott, R-Mich., Bishop, R-Mich., McCarthy, R-Calif., Pallone, D-N.J., Lujan, D-N.M., Sarbanes, D-Md., Green, D-Texas, Conyers, D-Mich., Jackson Lee, D-Texas, Chu, D-Calif., Cohen, D-Tenn., Esty, D-Conn., Kuster, D-N.H., Courtney, D-Conn., Barletta, R-Pa., Carter, R-Ga., Scott, D-Va., Bilirakis, R-Fla., Walorski, R-Ind., Ruiz, D-Calif., Meehan, R-Pa., Dold, R-Ill., and McDermott, D-Wash. Congressional Record p. H2458

  • May 17, 2016House Vote 198 Opioid Abuse Treatment and Prevention — Motion to Instruct
    Esty, D-Conn., motion to instruct conferees to agree to Title III of the Senate-passed bill relating to treatment and recovery programs. Motion rejected 182-236. Congressional Record p. H2456-H2457

  • May 16, 2016Titus, D-Nev., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.191, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E711

  • May 16, 2016Titus, D-Nev., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.190, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E711

  • May 16, 2016Titus, D-Nev., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.193, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E711

  • May 16, 2016Speier, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.193, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E708

  • May 16, 2016Speier, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.191, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E708

  • May 16, 2016Speier, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.190, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E708

  • May 16, 2016Himes, D-Conn., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.191, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E705

  • May 16, 2016Himes, D-Conn., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.190, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E705

  • May 13, 2016Knight, R-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.193, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H2374

  • May 13, 2016Knight, R-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.191, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H2374

  • May 13, 2016Knight, R-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.190, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H2374

  • May 13, 2016Sanford, R-S.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.193, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H2374

  • May 13, 2016Sanford, R-S.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.191, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H2374

  • May 13, 2016Sanford, R-S.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.190, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H2374

  • May 13, 2016 — Esty, D-Conn., motion to instruct House conferees to recede to Title III of the bill related to treatment and recovery programs, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. H2374-H2376

  • May 13, 2016 — Brooks, R-Ind., motion that the House insist on its amendments to the bill and request a conference with the Senate, agreed to by unanimous consent. Congressional Record p. H2374

  • May 13, 2016House Vote 193 Opioid Abuse Treatment and Prevention — Passage
    Passage of a bill, as amended, that would allow nurse practitioners and physician assistants who do not formally register with the Justice Department to administer medication to treat opioid addiction, authorize the Health and Human Services Department to issue grants to states to encourage pharmacies to issue opioid overdose reversal medication pursuant to a "standing order," which permits pharmacists to dispense medication without a person-specific prescription. It also would authorize the Justice Department to issue grants to state and local governments for services related to opioid abuse. The measure also would establish a grant program for co-prescribing opioid overdose reversal drugs and would reauthorize residential treatment grant programs for pregnant and postpartum women with substance abuse problems that are administered by the Health and Human Services Department's Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. Passed 400-5. Congressional Record p. H2373-H2374

  • May 13, 2016 — Considered by the House. Congressional Record p. H2355-H2376

  • May 13, 2016House Vote 191 Opioid Abuse Treatment and Prevention — Rule
    Adoption of the rule (H Res 725) that would provide for House floor consideration of the bill (S 524) that would authorize grants related for opioid treatment services and would include other provisions related to opioids. The rule would provide for a substitute amendment consisting of a package of House-passed measures to be considered adopted, including bills that would: authorize grants to states to encourage pharmacies to issue opioid overdose reversal medication pursuant to a "standing order," which permits pharmacists to dispense medication without a person-specific prescription; allow nurse practitioners and physician assistants who do not formally register with the Justice Department to administer medication to treat opioid addiction; and authorize grants to state and local governments for services related to opioid abuse. Adopted 240-165. Congressional Record p. H2354

  • May 13, 2016House Vote 190 Opioid Abuse Treatment and Prevention — Previous Question
    Collins, R-Ga., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 725) that would provide for House floor consideration of the bill (S 524) that would authorize grants related for opioid treatment services and include other provisions related to opioids. Motion agreed to 232-172. Congressional Record p. H2353-H2354

  • May 12, 2016 — Rules Committee resolution, H Res 725, reported to the House as a rule for S 524.

  • May 12, 2016 — House Rules Committee granted a closed rule providing for consideration of the bill. Congressional Record p. H2318, H2340

  • May 12, 2016 — Full committee proceeding held by the House Rules Committee.

  • March 14, 2016 — Received in the House and held at the desk. Congressional Record p. H1304

  • March 10, 2016M. Lee, R-Utah, Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.34, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. S1404

  • March 10, 2016McCaskill, D-Mo., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.34, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1434

  • March 10, 2016Senate Vote 34 Opioid Abuse Prevention and Treatment — Passage
    Passage of the bill that, as amended, would authorize federal grants to states, local governments and nonprofit organizations to prevent and treat opioid abuse. It would authorize grants to expand availability of medication-assisted treatment, create treatment programs as alternatives to incarceration, make opioid overdose reversal drugs like naloxone available to first-responders, and mandate investigations into heroin distribution and unlawful distribution of prescription opioids. The measure would further require the Office of National Drug Control Policy to create a national drug awareness campaign that takes into account the association between prescription opioid abuse and heroin use; direct the Health and Human Services secretary to convene a task force to review and update best practices for prescribing pain medication; and require the Justice Department to create and expand disposal sites for unwanted prescription medications. As amended, the bill would provide follow-up services to people who have received opioid overdose reversal drugs and provide the Department of Justice with additional tools to target transnational drug trafficking. Passed 94-1. Congressional Record p. S1404

  • March 10, 2016 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S1403-S1404

  • March 9, 2016McCaskill, D-Mo., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.33, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1375

  • March 9, 2016Senate Vote 33 Opioid Abuse Prevention and Treatment — Cloture
    Motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the bill that would authorize federal grants to states, local governments and nonprofit organizations to prevent and treat opioid abuse. It would authorize grants to expand availability of medication-assisted treatment, create treatment programs as alternatives to incarceration, make opioid overdose reversal drugs like naloxone available to first-responders, and mandate investigations into heroin distribution and unlawful distribution of prescription opioids. The measure would further require the Office of National Drug Control Policy to create a national drug awareness campaign that takes into account the association between prescription opioid abuse and heroin use; direct the Health and Human Services secretary to convene a task force to review and update best practices for prescribing pain medication; and require the Justice Department to create and expand disposal sites for unwanted prescription medications. Motion agreed to 93-3. Note: Three-fifths of the total Senate (60) is required to invoke cloture. Congressional Record p. S1361

  • March 9, 2016 — Grassley, R-Iowa, for Donnelly, D-Ind., amendment no. 3374, as modified, to Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378, adopted by voice vote. Congressional Record p. S1357-S1361

  • March 9, 2016 — Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378, as amended, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S1357-S1361

  • March 9, 2016 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S1357-S1384

  • March 9, 2016 — Franken, D-Minn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3449 (3369). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1389-S1392

  • March 8, 2016Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.32, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1340

  • March 8, 2016McCaskill, D-Mo., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.32, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1340

  • March 8, 2016 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the bill (60 votes required), pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S1328-S1332, S1332-S1341

  • March 8, 2016 — Grassley, R-Iowa, for Donnelly, D-Ind., amendment no. 3374, as modified, to Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S1328-S1332, S1332-S1341

  • March 8, 2016 — Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S1328-S1332, S1332-S1341

  • March 8, 2016 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S1328-S1332, S1332-S1341

  • March 8, 2016 — Cardin, D-Md., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3448. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1348

  • March 7, 2016Toomey, R-Pa., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.32, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1311

  • March 7, 2016 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the bill (60 votes required), pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S1303-S1313

  • March 7, 2016Senate Vote 32 Opioid Abuse Prevention and Treatment — Cloture
    Motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378 that would authorize federal grants to states, local governments and nonprofit organizations to prevent and treat opioid abuse, including grants to: expand availability of medication-assisted treatment, create treatment programs as alternatives to incarceration, make opioid overdose reversal drugs like naloxone available to first responders, and investigate heroin distribution and unlawful distribution of prescription opioids. It also would require the Office of National Drug Control Policy to create a national drug awareness campaign that takes into account the link between prescription opioid abuse and heroin use, direct the Health and Human Services secretary to convene a task force to review and update best practices for prescribing pain medication, and require the Justice Department to create and expand disposal sites for unwanted prescription drugs. Motion agreed to 86-3. Note: Three-fifths of the total Senate (60) is required to invoke cloture. Congressional Record p. S1311

  • March 7, 2016 — Grassley, R-Iowa, for Donnelly, D-Ind., amendment no. 3374, as modified, to Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S1303-S1313

  • March 7, 2016 — Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S1303-S1313

  • March 7, 2016 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S1303-S1313

  • March 7, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Booker, (D-N.J.)
  • March 7, 2016 — Thune, R-S.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3446 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1321-S1322

  • March 7, 2016 — Warren, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3445. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1321

  • March 7, 2016 — Blunt, R-Mo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3444 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1321

  • March 7, 2016 — Cassidy, R-La., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3443 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1320-S1321

  • March 7, 2016 — Cassidy, R-La., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3442 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1320

  • March 7, 2016 — Barrasso, R-Wyo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3441 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1320

  • March 7, 2016 — Heitkamp, D-N.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3440. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1319-S1320

  • March 7, 2016 — M. Bennet, D-Colo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3439. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1319

  • March 7, 2016 — Blumenthal, D-Conn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3438. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1318-S1319

  • March 7, 2016 — Franken, D-Minn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3437. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1318

  • March 7, 2016 — Heinrich, D-N.M., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3436. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1318

  • March 7, 2016 — Schatz, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3435. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1318

  • March 7, 2016 — Heller, R-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3434 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1318

  • March 7, 2016 — Heller, R-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3433 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1318

  • March 7, 2016 — R. Johnson, R-Wis., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3432 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1317-S1318

  • March 7, 2016 — R. Johnson, R-Wis., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3431 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1317

  • March 7, 2016 — Hoeven, R-N.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3430. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1317

  • March 7, 2016 — Daines, R-Mont., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3429. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316, S1317

  • March 7, 2016 — Cornyn, R-Texas (for Toomey, R-Pa.), amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3428. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1316-S1317

  • March 3, 2016Toomey, R-Pa., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.31, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1263

  • March 3, 2016Cornyn, R-Texas, Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.31, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1263

  • March 3, 2016McCaskill, D-Mo., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.31, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1272

  • March 3, 2016Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.31, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1272

  • March 3, 2016 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the bill (60 votes required), pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S1273

  • March 3, 2016 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378 (60 votes required), pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S1273

  • March 3, 2016Senate Vote 31 Opioid Abuse Prevention and Treatment — Opioid Risk Education
    Manchin, D-W.Va., amendment no. 3420 to the Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378, that would require the Department of Health and Human Services and the Attorney General to provide information to the public, providers, and patients on the dangers of opioid abuse, safe disposal of prescription medications, and early detection of addiction. Adopted 90-0. Congressional Record p. S1263

  • March 3, 2016 — Grassley, R-Iowa, for Donnelly, D-Ind., amendment no. 3374, as modified, to Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S1245-S1273

  • March 3, 2016 — Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S1245-S1273

  • March 3, 2016 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S1245-S1273

  • March 3, 2016 — Rand Paul, R-Ky., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3426 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1285, S1286-S1287

  • March 3, 2016 — Hoeven, R-N.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3425 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1284, S1286

  • March 3, 2016 — Shaheen, D-N.H., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3424. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1284, S1286

  • March 3, 2016 — Kirk, R-Ill., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3423 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1284, S1286

  • March 3, 2016 — Cardin, D-Md., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3422. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1284, S1286

  • March 3, 2016 — Cardin, D-Md., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3421 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1284, S1285-S1286

  • March 3, 2016 — Manchin, D-W.Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3420 (3378). Congressional Record p. S1284, S1285

  • March 3, 2016 — S. Collins, R-Maine, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3419. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1284, S1285

  • March 3, 2016 — Franken, D-Minn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3418. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1284, S1285

  • March 3, 2016 — Flake, R-Ariz., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3417. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1284, S1285

  • March 2, 2016H. Reid, D-Nev., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.30, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1217

  • March 2, 2016McCaskill, D-Mo., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.30, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1217

  • March 2, 2016McCaskill, D-Mo., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.29, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1217

  • March 2, 2016McCaskill, D-Mo., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.28, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1217

  • March 2, 2016 — Grassley, R-Iowa, for Donnelly, D-Ind., amendment no. 3374, as modified, to Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S1206-S1218

  • March 2, 2016Senate Vote 30 Opioid Abuse Prevention and Treatment — Motion to Waive
    Shaheen, D-N.H., motion to waive applicable portions of the Budget Act with respect to the Enzi, R-Wyo., point of order against the Shaheen, D-N.H., amendment no. 3345 to the Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378. The Shaheen amendment would make available $600 million for opioid-prevention and -treatment programs. Motion rejected 48-47. Note: A three-fifths majority vote (60) of the total Senate is required to waive the Budget Act. (Subsequently the chair upheld the point of order and the amendment fell.) A "yea" was a vote in support of the president's position. Congressional Record p. S1205-S1206

  • March 2, 2016 — Enzi, R-Wyo., point of order, that the Shaheen, D-N.H. amendment no. 3345 to the Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378 would cause the aggregate level of budget authority and outlays for fiscal year 2016 to be exceeded, sustained when a motion to waive was rejected. Congressional Record p. S1205-S1206

  • March 2, 2016Senate Vote 29 Opioid Abuse Prevention and Treatment — Motion to Waive
    Wyden, D-Ore., motion to waive applicable provisions of the Budget Act with respect to the Enzi, R-Wyo., point of order against the Wyden, D-Ore., amendment no. 3395 to the Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378. The Wyden amendment would increase anti-kickback penalties and test a model for limiting unnecessary Medicare opioid prescriptions. Motion rejected 46-50. Note: A three-fifths majority vote (60) of the total Senate is required to waive the Budget Act. (Subsequently the chair upheld the point of order and the amendment fell.) Congressional Record p. S1204

  • March 2, 2016 — Enzi, R-Wyo., point of order, that the Wyden, D-Ore., amendment no. 3395 to the Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378 would cause the underlying legislation to exceed the authorizing committee's section 302 (a) allocation of the new budget authority or outlays, sustained when a motion to waive was rejected. Congressional Record p. S1204

  • March 2, 2016 — Wyden, D-Ore., amendment no. 3395 to Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378, fell when the Enzi, R-Wyo. point of order was sustained by the chair. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S1192-S1203, S1204

  • March 2, 2016 — Grassley, R-Iowa, for Toomey, R-Pa., amendment no. 3367 to the Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378, adopted by voice vote. Congressional Record p. S1192, S1205-S1206

  • March 2, 2016 — Shaheen, D-N.H., amendment no. 3345 to Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378, fell when the Enzi, R-Wyo. point of order was sustained by the chair. Congressional Record p. S1181-S1192, S1205-S1206

  • March 2, 2016Senate Vote 28 Opioid Abuse Prevention and Treatment — Transnational Drug Trafficking
    Feinstein, D-Calif., amendment no. 3362 to the Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378, that would provide the Department of Justice with additional legal tools to target transnational drug trafficking, by making it illegal to manufacture or distribute a chemical used to manufacture a controlled substance, or to knowingly use a counterfeit mark on or in connection with a controlled substance. Adopted 94-0. Note: A 60 vote threshold was required for passage of the bill, pursuant to a unanimous consent agreement. Congressional Record p. S1203-S1204

  • March 2, 2016 — Grassley, R-Iowa, substitute amendment no. 3378, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. S1180

  • March 2, 2016 — Senate Judiciary Committee-reported amendment, withdrawn by unanimous consent. Congressional Record p. S1180

  • March 2, 2016 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S1171-S1218

  • March 2, 2016 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to proceed to the bill, agreed to by unanimous consent. Congressional Record p. S1171

  • March 2, 2016 — Barrasso, R-Wyo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3416. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1238

  • March 2, 2016 — Barrasso, R-Wyo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3415. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1238

  • March 2, 2016 — Barrasso, R-Wyo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3414. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1238

  • March 2, 2016 — Schatz, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3413. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1238

  • March 2, 2016 — Merkley, D-Ore., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3412 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1237-S1238

  • March 2, 2016 — Tester, D-Mont., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3411 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1237

  • March 2, 2016 — H. Reid, D-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3410 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1237

  • March 2, 2016 — S. Collins, R-Maine, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3409 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1236

  • March 2, 2016 — McCain, R-Ariz., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3408. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1236

  • March 2, 2016 — McCain, R-Ariz., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3407 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1236

  • March 2, 2016 — Thune, R-S.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3406 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1235

  • March 2, 2016 — Thune, R-S.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3405 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1235

  • March 2, 2016 — Thune, R-S.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3404 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1235

  • March 2, 2016 — Thune, R-S.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3403 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1235

  • March 2, 2016 — Wyden, D-Ore., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3402 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1235

  • March 2, 2016 — Cornyn, R-Texas, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3401 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1235

  • March 2, 2016 — Cornyn, R-Texas, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3400 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1234

  • March 2, 2016 — Heitkamp, D-N.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3399. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1234

  • March 2, 2016 — Udall, D-N.M., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3398. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1234

  • March 2, 2016 — Hatch, R-Utah, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3397 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1233-S1234

  • March 2, 2016 — Wicker, R-Miss., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3396 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1233

  • March 2, 2016 — Wyden, D-Ore., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3395 (3378). Congressional Record p. S1227, S1233

  • March 2, 2016 — Leahy, D-Vt., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3394. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1232-S1233

  • March 2, 2016 — Merkley, D-Ore., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3393. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1232

  • March 2, 2016 — Blunt, R-Mo., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3392 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1232

  • March 2, 2016 — Daines, R-Mont., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3391 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1232

  • March 2, 2016 — Daines, R-Mont., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3390 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1232

  • March 2, 2016 — Wyden, D-Ore., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3389. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1229-S1231

  • March 2, 2016 — Markey, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3388. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1228-S1229

  • March 2, 2016 — Thune, R-S.D., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3387 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1228

  • March 2, 2016 — Cochran, R-Miss., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3386 (3378). (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1227, S1228

  • March 1, 2016 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to proceed to the bill, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S1106-S1115, S1115-S1132

  • March 1, 2016Statement of Administration Policy issued by Office of Management and Budget.

  • March 1, 2016 — Cardin, D-Md., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3360. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1143-S1144

  • March 1, 2016 — H. Reid, D-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3375. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1151

  • March 1, 2016 — Cardin, D-Md., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3361. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1144-S1146

  • March 1, 2016 — Ernst, R-Iowa, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3373. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1151

  • March 1, 2016 — Cardin, D-Md., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3359. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1143

  • March 1, 2016 — Donnelly, D-Ind., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3374. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1151

  • March 1, 2016 — S. Collins, R-Maine, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3363. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1146-S1147

  • March 1, 2016 — Kaine, D-Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3376. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1151

  • March 1, 2016 — Feinstein, D-Calif., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3362. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1146

  • March 1, 2016 — S. Collins, R-Maine, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3364. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1147

  • March 1, 2016 — Markey, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3383. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1166-S1167

  • March 1, 2016 — Heinrich, D-N.M., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3372. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1150

  • March 1, 2016 — Cardin, D-Md., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3358. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1143

  • March 1, 2016 — Markey, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3384. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1167

  • March 1, 2016 — Daines, R-Mont., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3385. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1167

  • March 1, 2016 — Markey, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3381. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1165-S1166

  • March 1, 2016 — Cornyn, R-Texas, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3368. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1150

  • March 1, 2016 — Warren, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3353. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1142

  • March 1, 2016 — Heller, R-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3351. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1140-S1141

  • March 1, 2016 — Tester, D-Mont., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3380. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1165

  • March 1, 2016 — Toomey, R-Pa., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3367. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1147-S1150

  • March 1, 2016 — Capito, R-W.Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3352. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141

  • March 1, 2016 — Cornyn, R-Texas, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3370. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1150

  • March 1, 2016 — Schatz, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3371. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1150

  • March 1, 2016 — Flake, R-Ariz., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3355. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1142

  • March 1, 2016 — Markey, D-Mass., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3382. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1166

  • March 1, 2016 — Cornyn, R-Texas, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3369. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1150

  • March 1, 2016 — Gillibrand, D-N.Y., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3354. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1142

  • March 1, 2016 — Flake, R-Ariz., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3356. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1142

  • March 1, 2016 — Shaheen, D-N.H., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3357. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1142-S1143

  • March 1, 2016 — S. Collins, R-Maine, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3365. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1147

  • March 1, 2016 — Baldwin, D-Wis., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3379. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1163-S1165

  • March 1, 2016 — Lankford, R-Okla., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3366. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1147

  • March 1, 2016 — A. King, I-Maine, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3377. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1151-S1154

  • March 1, 2016 — Grassley, R-Iowa, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3378. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1141, S1154-S1163

  • Feb. 29, 2016McCaskill, D-Mo., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.27, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1081

  • Feb. 29, 2016Toomey, R-Pa., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.27, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1076

  • Feb. 29, 2016Sullivan, R-Alaska, Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.27, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1076

  • Feb. 29, 2016Alexander, R-Tenn., Senate speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.27, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. S1076

  • Feb. 29, 2016Senate Vote 27 Opioid Abuse Prevention and Treatment — Cloture
    Motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the McConnell, R-Ky., motion to proceed to the bill that would authorize the Attorney General and the Department of Health and Human Services to issue grants to states, organizations and local entities for the purposes of opioid abuse-prevention and -treatment programs. Motion agreed to 89-0. Note: Three-fifths of the total Senate (60) is required to invoke cloture. Congressional Record p. S1076

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to proceed to the bill, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S1074-S1080

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Hirono, (D-Hawaii)Sanders, (I-Vt.)Stabenow, (D-Mich.)
  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Murkowski, L. (R-Alaska)
  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Schatz, D-Hawaii, amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3350. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1101

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Booker, D-N.J., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3349. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1098-S1101

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Manchin, D-W.Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3348. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1098

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Heller, R-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3347. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1098

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Heller, R-Nev., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3346. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1098

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Shaheen, D-N.H., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3345. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1097-S1098

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Manchin, D-W.Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3344. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1097

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Manchin, D-W.Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3343. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1097

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Manchin, D-W.Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3342. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1097

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Manchin, D-W.Va., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3341. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1096-S1097

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — R. Johnson, R-Wis., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3340. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1096

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — R. Johnson, R-Wis., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3339. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1094-S1096

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — R. Johnson, R-Wis., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3338. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1094

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — R. Johnson, R-Wis., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3337. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1094

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — R. Johnson, R-Wis., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3336. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1094

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — R. Johnson, R-Wis., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3335. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1093

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Kirk, R-Ill., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3334. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1093

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Blumenthal, D-Conn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3333. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1093

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Durbin, D-Ill., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3332. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1093

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Durbin, D-Ill., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3331. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1093

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Durbin, D-Ill., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3330. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1092-S1093

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Durbin, D-Ill., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3329. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1092

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — J. Reed, D-R.I., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3328. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1090-S1092

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Blumenthal, D-Conn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3327. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1090

  • Feb. 29, 2016 — Blumenthal, D-Conn., amendment introduced in the Senate: amendment no 3326. (Ordered to lie on the table.) Congressional Record p. S1089, S1090

  • Feb. 25, 2016 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the motion to proceed to the bill (60 votes required), pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S1037-S1045

  • Feb. 25, 2016 — McConnell, R-Ky., motion to proceed to the bill, pending at recess. Congressional Record p. S1037-S1045

  • Feb. 25, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Boozman, (R-Ark.)Kaine, (D-Va.)McCaskill, (D-Mo.)
  • Feb. 24, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Tillis, (R-N.C.)
  • Feb. 24, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Schatz, (D-Hawaii)
  • Feb. 23, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Coats, (R-Ind.)
  • Feb. 22, 2016 — Reported to the Senate with an amendment in the nature of a substitute and without a written report by the Senate Judiciary Committee and placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar. Congressional Record p. S910

  • Feb. 22, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Blunt, (R-Mo.)
  • Feb. 22, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Cornyn, (R-Texas)Grassley, (R-Iowa)
  • Feb. 11, 2016 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the Senate Judiciary Committee.

    Feb. 11, 2016 — Committee Vote: Opioid Abuse Treatment — Substitute Amendment
      Grassley, R-Iowa —

    Substitute amendment that would make a number of changes including:

    • Specify that the Pain Management Best Practices Inter-Agency Task Force would convene to review, modify, and update, as appropriate, best practices for pain management and prescribing pain medication and require the task force to include representatives from the Food and Drug Administration and National Institutes of Health;
    • Eliminate the authorization levels for many of the bill's grant programs;
    • Allow grants, related to the program where eligible entities can develop, implement or expand a treatment alternative to incarceration program for eligible participants, to be used to facilitate or enhance planning and collaboration between state criminal justice systems and state substance abuse systems to carry out programs that would deal with the use of heroin and misuse of prescription drugs. It also would specify that for five years from the bill's enactment date, the Health and Human Services secretary would be able to use funds dedicated for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for Criminal Justice activities to do this grant program;
    • Eliminate the authorization amount for the grant program, which would allow appropriately trained first responders to administer an opioid overdose reversal drug to an individual who has either had an overdose or likely experienced one, and specify that in making grants, the secretary would be required to ensure that at least 25 percent of the grants would be awarded to eligible entities not located in metropolitan statistical areas;
    • Specify that for five years from the bill's enactment date, the secretary would be able to use funds dedicated for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for Criminal Justice activities to do this grant program, which would allow eligible entities to implement medication assisted treatment and intervention programs through criminal justice agencies;
    • Allow the secretary to do a pilot program in which HHS can make grants to state substance abuse agencies to do a number if things including easing flexibility in fund use to support family-based services for pregnant and postpartum women with a primary diagnosis of a substance abuse disorder; help state substance abuse agencies address service gaps to the women in terms of care; and promote a state system through the use of new approaches and service delivery models that are evidence-based. The bill would authorize $77.9 million annually in fiscal 2016 through 2020 for the program;
    • Specify that the attorney general may use from the Justice Department "General Administration" any unobligated balances but could not exceed $5 million per fiscal year to fund the program which would allow the attorney general to award grants to states to create and implement a comprehensive plan to respond to opioid abuse. The plan would include prevention and education efforts on heroin and opioid use as well as treatment and recovery tools, a complete prescription drug monitoring program to track the dispensing of certain controlled substances and developing and expanding program to prevent overdose death from prescription medications and opioids; and
    • Provide grant accountability for all Justice and Health and Human Services departments programs grants that are specified in the bill.

    Substitute amendment that would make a number of changes including:

    • Specify that the Pain Management Best Practices Inter-Agency Task Force would convene to review, modify, and update, as appropriate, best practices for pain management and prescribing pain medication and require the task force to include representatives from the Food and Drug Administration and National Institutes of Health;
    • Eliminate the authorization levels for many of the bill's grant programs;
    • Allow grants, related to the program where eligible entities can develop, implement or expand a treatment alternative to incarceration program for eligible participants, to be used to facilitate or enhance planning and collaboration between state criminal justice systems and state substance abuse systems to carry out programs that would deal with the use of heroin and misuse of prescription drugs. It also would specify that for five years from the bill's enactment date, the Health and Human Services secretary would be able to use funds dedicated for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for Criminal Justice activities to do this grant program;
    • Eliminate the authorization amount for the grant program, which would allow appropriately trained first responders to administer an opioid overdose reversal drug to an individual who has either had an overdose or likely experienced one, and specify that in making grants, the secretary would be required to ensure that at least 25 percent of the grants would be awarded to eligible entities not located in metropolitan statistical areas;
    • Specify that for five years from the bill's enactment date, the secretary would be able to use funds dedicated for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for Criminal Justice activities to do this grant program, which would allow eligible entities to implement medication assisted treatment and intervention programs through criminal justice agencies;
    • Allow the secretary to do a pilot program in which HHS can make grants to state substance abuse agencies to do a number if things including easing flexibility in fund use to support family-based services for pregnant and postpartum women with a primary diagnosis of a substance abuse disorder; help state substance abuse agencies address service gaps to the women in terms of care; and promote a state system through the use of new approaches and service delivery models that are evidence-based. The bill would authorize $77.9 million annually in fiscal 2016 through 2020 for the program;
    • Specify that the attorney general may use from the Justice Department "General Administration" any unobligated balances but could not exceed $5 million per fiscal year to fund the program which would allow the attorney general to award grants to states to create and implement a comprehensive plan to respond to opioid abuse. The plan would include prevention and education efforts on heroin and opioid use as well as treatment and recovery tools, a complete prescription drug monitoring program to track the dispensing of certain controlled substances and developing and expanding program to prevent overdose death from prescription medications and opioids; and
    • Provide grant accountability for all Justice and Health and Human Services departments programs grants that are specified in the bill.
    • Adopted by voice vote.

      Feb. 11, 2016 — Committee Vote: Opioid Abuse Treatment — Vote to Report

      Authorize the attorney general to award grants to eligible entities to address the national epidemics of prescription opioid abuse and heroin use.

      Specifically, it would allow the entities to:

      • Implement comprehensive community-wide strategies that address a sudden increase or higher than national average rate in opioid or methamphetamine abuse within the area served by the entity;
      • Design, implement and expand educational programs for offenders in prisons, jails and juvenile facilities to pay for such things as basic and secondary education classes and inmate screening and assessment to assess education level and aptitude; and
      • Create and implement a comprehensive plan to respond to opioid abuse which would contain prevention and education efforts on heroin and opioid use; treatment and recovery plans; a complete prescription drug monitoring program to track the dispensing of certain controlled substances; and a program to prevent overdose death from prescription medications and opioids.

      It would allow the attorney general to make grants to state law enforcement agencies to locate or investigate illicit activities such as the distribution or heroin or fentanyl or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids or unlawful trafficking of those items.

      It also would require the Office of National Drug Control Policy to create a public drug awareness campaign that would, among other things, explain the association between prescription opioid abuse and heroin use.

      The bill also would authorize the secretary of Health and Human Services to make grants to local government, Native American tribes or nonprofit organizations concerning opioid abuse and heroin use.

      Specifically it would allow the entities to:

      • Develop, implement or expand a treatment alternative to incarceration programs for eligible participants for pre-booking and post-booking. The grants also could facilitate or enhance planning and collaboration between state criminal justice systems and state substance abuse systems to carry out programs that would deal with the use of heroin and misuse of prescription drugs;
      • Allow appropriately trained first responders to administer an opioid overdose reversal drug to an individual who has either had an overdose or likely experienced one; and
      • Implement medicated assisted treatment programs through state, local or tribal courts, prisons, jails or other criminal justice agencies.

      It would allow the secretary to award grants to state substance abuse agencies, local governments, Native American tribes and nonprofit organizations to expand activities, including to increase the availability of medication assisted treatment and other clinically appropriate services, in areas that have a high rate or sudden increase in heroin or opioid usage.

      As amended, the bill also would allow the HHS to do a pilot program in which the secretary can make grants to state substance abuse agencies to do a number if things including easing flexibility in fund use to support family-based services for pregnant and postpartum women with a primary diagnosis of a substance abuse disorder. The bill would authorize $77.9 million annually in fiscal 2016 through 2020 for the program.

      Authorize the attorney general to award grants to eligible entities to address the national epidemics of prescription opioid abuse and heroin use.

      Specifically, it would allow the entities to:

    • Implement comprehensive community-wide strategies that address a sudden increase or higher than national average rate in opioid or methamphetamine abuse within the area served by the entity;
    • Design, implement and expand educational programs for offenders in prisons, jails and juvenile facilities to pay for such things as basic and secondary education classes and inmate screening and assessment to assess education level and aptitude; and
    • Create and implement a comprehensive plan to respond to opioid abuse which would contain prevention and education efforts on heroin and opioid use; treatment and recovery plans; a complete prescription drug monitoring program to track the dispensing of certain controlled substances; and a program to prevent overdose death from prescription medications and opioids.
    • It would allow the attorney general to make grants to state law enforcement agencies to locate or investigate illicit activities such as the distribution or heroin or fentanyl or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids or unlawful trafficking of those items.

      It also would require the Office of National Drug Control Policy to create a public drug awareness campaign that would, among other things, explain the association between prescription opioid abuse and heroin use.

      The bill also would authorize the secretary of Health and Human Services to make grants to local government, Native American tribes or nonprofit organizations concerning opioid abuse and heroin use.

      Specifically it would allow the entities to:

    • Develop, implement or expand a treatment alternative to incarceration programs for eligible participants for pre-booking and post-booking. The grants also could facilitate or enhance planning and collaboration between state criminal justice systems and state substance abuse systems to carry out programs that would deal with the use of heroin and misuse of prescription drugs;
    • Allow appropriately trained first responders to administer an opioid overdose reversal drug to an individual who has either had an overdose or likely experienced one; and
    • Implement medicated assisted treatment programs through state, local or tribal courts, prisons, jails or other criminal justice agencies.
    • It would allow the secretary to award grants to state substance abuse agencies, local governments, Native American tribes and nonprofit organizations to expand activities, including to increase the availability of medication assisted treatment and other clinically appropriate services, in areas that have a high rate or sudden increase in heroin or opioid usage.

      As amended, the bill also would allow the HHS to do a pilot program in which the secretary can make grants to state substance abuse agencies to do a number if things including easing flexibility in fund use to support family-based services for pregnant and postpartum women with a primary diagnosis of a substance abuse disorder. The bill would authorize $77.9 million annually in fiscal 2016 through 2020 for the program.

      Ordered reported favorably to the full Senate (as amended) by voice vote.

  • Feb. 11, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Durbin, (D-Ill.)
  • Feb. 9, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Udall, (D-N.M.)
  • Feb. 8, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Rubio, (R-Fla.)
  • Feb. 4, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Tester, (D-Mont.)
  • Jan. 28, 2016 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the Senate Judiciary Committee.

  • Jan. 28, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Heinrich, (D-N.M.)Sullivan, (R-Alaska)
  • Jan. 27, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Donnelly, (D-Ind.)
  • Jan. 21, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Capito, (R-W.Va.)
  • Jan. 12, 2016 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Leahy, (D-Vt.)
  • Sept. 29, 2015 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Blumenthal, (D-Conn.)
  • Sept. 28, 2015 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Manchin (D-W.Va.)
  • Sept. 21, 2015 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    King, A. (I-Maine)
  • Sept. 17, 2015 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Menendez, (D-N.J.)Shaheen, (D-N.H.)
  • July 7, 2015 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Baldwin, (D-Wis.)
  • May 22, 2015 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Graham, L. (R-S.C.)
  • May 20, 2015 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Hatch, (R-Utah)
  • April 16, 2015 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Collins, S. (R-Maine)
  • March 11, 2015 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Gillibrand, (D-N.Y.)
  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Schumer, (D-N.Y.)
  • Feb. 24, 2015 — Additional cosponsor(s): 4

    Feinstein, (D-Calif.)Nelson, Bill (D-Fla.)
    Franken, (D-Minn.)Warren, (D-Mass.)
  • Feb. 12, 2015 — Original cosponsor(s): 5

    Ayotte, (R-N.H.)Kirk, (R-Ill.)Portman, (R-Ohio)
    Coons, (D-Del.)Klobuchar, (D-Minn.)
  • Feb. 12, 2015 — Companion measure, HR 953, introduced by Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (R-Wis.).

  • Feb. 12, 2015 — Read twice and referred to: Senate Judiciary.Congressional Record p. S983