Federal - HR 1309

A bill to direct the Secretary of Labor to issue an occupational safety and health standard that requires covered employers within the health care and social service industries to develop and implement a comprehensive workplace violence prevention plan, and for other purposes.

Introduced

February 19, 2019

Description

A bill to direct the Secretary of Labor to issue an occupational safety and health standard that requires covered employers within the health care and social service industries to develop and implement a comprehensive workplace violence prevention plan, and for other purposes.

Our Position

Support

Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 228

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  • Jan. 9, 2020John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.642, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E19

  • Jan. 9, 2020John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.641, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E19

  • Jan. 9, 2020John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.640, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E19

  • Jan. 9, 2020John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.639, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E19

  • Jan. 9, 2020John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.638, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E19

  • Jan. 9, 2020John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.637, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E19

  • Jan. 9, 2020John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.633, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E19

  • Jan. 9, 2020John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.632, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E19

  • Dec. 4, 2019Timmons, R-S.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.642, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1536

  • Dec. 4, 2019Timmons, R-S.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.641, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1536

  • Dec. 4, 2019Timmons, R-S.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.640, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1536

  • Dec. 4, 2019John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.642, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1538

  • Dec. 4, 2019John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.641, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1538

  • Dec. 4, 2019John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.640, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1538

  • Dec. 4, 2019John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.639, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1538

  • Dec. 4, 2019John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.638, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1538

  • Dec. 4, 2019Moulton, D-Mass., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.642, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1539

  • Dec. 4, 2019Moulton, D-Mass., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.641, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1539

  • Dec. 4, 2019Moulton, D-Mass., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.640, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1539

  • Dec. 4, 2019Moulton, D-Mass., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.639, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1539

  • Dec. 4, 2019Moulton, D-Mass., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.638, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1539

  • Dec. 4, 2019Moulton, D-Mass., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.637, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1539

  • Dec. 4, 2019John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.637, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1538

  • Dec. 4, 2019Timmons, R-S.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.639, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1536

  • Dec. 4, 2019Timmons, R-S.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.638, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1536

  • Dec. 4, 2019Timmons, R-S.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.637, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1536

  • Dec. 4, 2019John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.633, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1538

  • Dec. 4, 2019John Lewis, D-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.632, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1538

  • Dec. 4, 2019Timmons, R-S.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.633, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1536

  • Dec. 4, 2019Timmons, R-S.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.632, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1536

  • Nov. 22, 2019Huffman, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.642, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1501

  • Nov. 22, 2019Huffman, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.641, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1501

  • Nov. 22, 2019Huffman, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.640, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1501

  • Nov. 22, 2019Huffman, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.639, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1501

  • Nov. 22, 2019Huffman, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.638, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1501

  • Nov. 22, 2019Evans, D-Pa., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.642, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1501

  • Nov. 22, 2019Evans, D-Pa., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.641, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1501

  • Nov. 22, 2019Evans, D-Pa., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.640, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1501

  • Nov. 22, 2019Evans, D-Pa., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.639, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1501

  • Nov. 22, 2019Evans, D-Pa., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.638, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1501

  • Nov. 22, 2019Evans, D-Pa., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.637, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1501

  • Nov. 22, 2019Huffman, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.637, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1501

  • Nov. 21, 2019House Vote 642 Workplace Violence Prevention — Passage
    Passage of the bill, as amended, that would require the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to issue a final workplace violence prevention standard that would require employers in the health care and social service industries to develop and implement comprehensive plans to prevent and protect employees from violent incidents at work. It would require OSHA to issue an interim final standard, based on 2015 OSHA guidelines, within one year of enactment and a final standard within 42 months of enactment. Among other provisions, it would require employers to develop and implement workplace violence prevention plans within six months of issuance of the interim final standard. It would require employers to develop plans with the participation of employees or employee representatives and to provide annual employee training related to the plans. It would require that the plans include certain procedures for reporting, responding to, and mitigating risks of incidents of workplace violence, including for employers to investigate and take corrective actions in response to violent incidents. It would require employers to maintain a record of all such incidents and incident response. The bill's provisions would apply to employers of any individuals who work in certain health care facilities -- including hospitals, nursing homes, or drug abuse treatment centers -- or individuals who provide certain services -- including home-based health care or social work and emergency services. Passed 251-158. Note: A "nay" was a vote in support of the president's position. Congressional Record p. H9154

  • Nov. 21, 2019House Vote 641 Workplace Violence Prevention — Motion to Table
    Hoyer, D-Md., motion to table the Kelly, R-Pa., motion to appeal of the ruling of the chair, effectively ruling a Kelly motion to recommit the bill not germane. The motion to table would sustain a ruling of the chair regarding a Courtney, D-Conn., point of order that the amendment contained in the Kelly motion to recommit the bill was not germane. The Kelly motion to recommit would have moved to recommit the bill to the House Education and Labor Committee with instructions to report it back immediately with an amendment that would express the sense of Congress that the House majority in the 116th Congress has "failed to deliver results" by prioritizing the impeachment of President Trump over working with the Trump administration and Republicans in Congress to enact legislation related to "critical issues," including implementation of the United States-Mexico-Canada trade agreement, annual Defense authorizations and appropriations for fiscal 2020, prescription drug pricing, and "secure operational control" of the U.S.-Mexico border. Motion agreed to 222-188. Congressional Record p. H9153-H9154

  • Nov. 21, 2019 — Kelly, R-Pa., motion to appeal the ruling of the chair in regard to the Courtney, D-Conn., point of order, tabled by roll call vote, 222-188. Congressional Record p. H9153-H9154

  • Nov. 21, 2019 — Courtney, D-Conn., point of order that the amendment contained in the Kelly, R-Pa., motion to recommit was not germane, sustained when the ruling of the chair was effectively sustained by roll call vote, 222-188. Congressional Record p. H9153-H9154

  • Nov. 21, 2019 — Kelly, R-Pa., motion to recommit the bill to the House Education and Labor Committee with instructions to report it back immediately with an amendment that would express the sense of Congress related to impeachment and legislative priorities in the 116th Congress, ruled not germane when the ruling of the chair was effectively sustained by roll call vote, 222-188. Congressional Record p. H9152-H9154

  • Nov. 21, 2019House Vote 640 Workplace Violence Prevention — OSHA Technical Assistance for Employers
    Delgado, D-N.Y., amendment no. 10 that would require that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard on workplace violence prevention required by the bill provide for a period, of up to a year, during which the agency would prioritize providing technical assistance and advice to employers subject to the standard. Adopted in Committee of the Whole 242-176. Congressional Record p. H9148-H9149, H9151-H9152

  • Nov. 21, 2019House Vote 639 Workplace Violence Prevention — Existing Legal Protections
    Wexton, D-Va., amendment no. 9 that would clarify that nothing in the bill should be understood to limit or diminish any protections in federal, state, or local law related to domestic violence, stalking, dating violence, or sexual assault. Adopted in Committee of the Whole 415-1. Congressional Record p. H9148, H9151

  • Nov. 21, 2019 — Garcia, D-Texas, amendment no. 8 that would require employers to incorporate changes to the workplace violence prevention plans required by the bill based on annual written evaluations conducted with the participation of employees, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H9147-H9148

  • Nov. 21, 2019 — Brown, D-Md., amendment no. 7 that would require that the annual employee trainings required by the bill include additional training for employees whose jobs require working with victims of torture, trafficking, or domestic violence, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H9146-H9147

  • Nov. 21, 2019 — Green, D-Texas, amendment no. 6 that would require the Labor Department to submit an annual report to Congress, by May 15 of each year, containing summaries of and statistical data related to violent incidents annually reported to the department by employers under the bill's provisions, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H9145-H9146

  • Nov. 21, 2019 — Levin, D-Mich., amendment no. 5 that would require that the annual employee trainings required by the bill include information on anti-retaliatory policies under the employer's workplace violence prevention plan, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H9144-H9145

  • Nov. 21, 2019House Vote 638 Workplace Violence Prevention — Violent Incident Reporting
    Harder, D-Calif., amendment no. 4 that would clarify that nothing in the bill should be understood to limit or prevent health care workers, social service workers, or other personnel from reporting violent incidents to the appropriate law enforcement agencies. Adopted in Committee of the Whole 414-1. Congressional Record p. H9143-H9144, H9150-H9151

  • Nov. 21, 2019House Vote 637 Workplace Violence Prevention — Remove Deadline and Other Requirements
    Byrne, R-Ala., substitute amendment no. 3 that would modify language in the bill to remove a requirement that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration workplace violence prevention standard required by the bill be based on existing 2015 OSHA guidelines. It would add findings to the bill describing recent studies and rulemaking related to workplace violence in the health care and social service industries, including to express that the 2015 OSHA guidelines are "not enforceable." Among other provisions, it would remove requirements in the bill establishing a deadline for OSHA promulgation of a final standard, and it would remove or reduce requirements related to types of violence addressed, mandatory employee training, and anti-retaliation policies under workplace violence prevention plans. It would require the Labor Department to conduct an education campaign for affected employers and employees regarding existing OSHA materials on workplace violence, during the rulemaking process for the new OSHA standard. Rejected in Committee of the Whole 177-238. Congressional Record p. H9140-H9143, H9149-H9150

  • Nov. 21, 2019 — DeSaulnier, D-Calif., amendment no. 2 that would require that the workplace violence prevention plans required by the bill include procedures to provide employees with information about available trauma and related counseling resources following an incidence of workplace violence, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H9139

  • Nov. 21, 2019 — Hastings, D-Fla., amendment no.1 that would require employers to email the workplace violence prevention plans required by the bill to employees upon completion of annual employee training required by the bill, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H9138-H9139

  • Nov. 21, 2019 — Considered by the House. Congressional Record p. H9127-H9154

  • Nov. 21, 2019 — Received in the Senate and referred to the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee. Congressional Record p. S6754

  • Nov. 20, 2019Schakowsky, D-Ill., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.633, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H9099

  • Nov. 20, 2019Porter, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.633, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H9099

  • Nov. 20, 2019Porter, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.632, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H9099

  • Nov. 20, 2019House Vote 633 Workplace Violence Prevention — Rule
    Adoption of the rule that would provide for House floor consideration of the Workplace Violence Prevention for Health Care and Social Service Workers Act (HR 1309). The rule would provide for automatic adoption of a Scott, D-Va., manager's amendment to HR 1309 and provide for floor consideration of 10 additional amendments to the bill. The manager's amendment to HR 1309 would specify that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration workplace violence standards to be issued under the bill's provisions would not apply to entities providing child day care services or to health practitioner offices not located in health care facilities. Adopted 209-205. Congressional Record p. H9098-H9099

  • Nov. 20, 2019House Vote 632 Workplace Violence Prevention — Previous Question
    DeSaulnier, D-Calif., motion to order the previous question on the rule (H Res 713) that would provide for House floor consideration of the Workplace Violence Prevention for Health Care and Social Service Workers Act (HR 1309). The rule would provide for automatic adoption of a Scott, D-Va., manager's amendment to HR 1309 and provide for floor consideration of 10 additional amendments to the bill. The Scott manager's amendment to HR 1309 would specify that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration workplace violence standards to be issued under the bill's provisions would not apply to entities providing child day care services or to health practitioner offices not located in health care facilities. Motion agreed to 223-194. Congressional Record p. H9072, H9098

  • Nov. 19, 2019 — Rules Committee resolution, H Res 713, reported to the House as a rule for HR 1309.

  • Nov. 19, 2019Statement of Administration Policy issued by Office of Management and Budget.

  • Nov. 19, 2019 — House Rules Committee granted a structured rule providing for consideration of the bill. Congressional Record p. H9049, H9056

  • Nov. 19, 2019 — Full committee proceeding held by the House Rules Committee.

  • Nov. 18, 2019 — House Energy and Commerce Committee discharged pursuant to clause 2 of Rule XIII. Congressional Record p. H8957-H8958

  • Nov. 18, 2019 — Reported to the House amended by the House Education and Labor Committee and placed on the Union Calendar. H Rept 116-296, Pt. 1)Congressional Record p. H8957

  • Nov. 18, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Casten, (D-Ill.)
  • Oct. 31, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Bishop, S. (D-Ga.)Richmond, (D-La.)
  • Oct. 23, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Fortenberry, (R-Neb.)
  • Oct. 1, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Escobar, (D-Texas)
  • Sept. 26, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Fletcher, (D-Texas)
  • Sept. 24, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Stauber, (R-Minn.)
  • Sept. 17, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Luria, (D-Va.)
  • Sept. 12, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    McEachin, (D-Va.)
  • Sept. 11, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Frankel, (D-Fla.)McNerney, (D-Calif.)
  • Sept. 9, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Beyer (D-Va.)Evans, (D-Pa.)
  • Aug. 27, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Sherrill, (D-N.J.)Stanton, (D-Ariz.)
  • Aug. 9, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Houlahan, (D-Pa.)Lewis, John (D-Ga.)
  • Aug. 6, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Garcia, (D-Texas)Lamb, (D-Pa.)Sewell, (D-Ala.)
  • July 30, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Horn, (D-Okla.)Schneider, (D-Ill.)
  • July 25, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Gottheimer, (D-N.J.)Torres Small, (D-N.M.)
  • July 23, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 7

    Connolly, (D-Va.)Nadler, (D-N.Y.)Swalwell, (D-Calif.)
    Deutch, (D-Fla.)Panetta, (D-Calif.)
    Maloney, C. (D-N.Y.)Schrader, (D-Ore.)
  • July 17, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Torres, (D-Calif.)
  • July 16, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Delgado, (D-N.Y.)Veasey, (D-Texas)
  • July 12, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Cummings, (D-Md.)Levin, (D-Calif.)Matsui, (D-Calif.)
  • June 25, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Young, Don (R-Alaska)
  • June 24, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Cole, (R-Okla.)Davids, (D-Kan.)Smith, C. (R-N.J.)
  • June 21, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    DeGette, (D-Colo.)Suozzi, (D-N.Y.)
  • June 20, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Sherman, (D-Calif.)
  • June 19, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 5

    Brindisi, (D-N.Y.)Keating, (D-Mass.)Peters, S. (D-Calif.)
    Huffman, (D-Calif.)Kind, (D-Wis.)
  • June 18, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Doyle, (D-Pa.)Kilmer, (D-Wash.)
  • June 14, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Butterfield, (D-N.C.)
  • June 12, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Gabbard, (D-Hawaii)Lujan, B.R. (D-N.M.)Schiff, (D-Calif.)
  • June 11, 2019 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Education and Labor Committee.

    June 11, 2019 — Committee Vote: Workplace Violence Prevention — Public Comment Period
      Stevens, D-Mich. —

    Amendment to the Courtney, D-Conn., substitute amendment that would direct the secretary of Labor to, before issuing the interim final standard on workplace violence prevention, provide notice in the Federal Register of the interim final standard and a 30-day public comment period.

    Amendment to the Courtney, D-Conn., substitute amendment that would direct the secretary of Labor to, before issuing the interim final standard on workplace violence prevention, provide notice in the Federal Register of the interim final standard and a 30-day public comment period.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    June 11, 2019 — Committee Vote: Workplace Violence Prevention — Substitute Amendment
      Byrne, R-Ala. —

    Substitute amendment to the Courtney, D-Conn., substitute amendment that would strike language in the findings section:

    • Citing Bureau of Labor Statistics data on workplace violence rates in the health care and service industries compared to the average workplace.
    • Stating that due to under-reporting, actual injury rates 15 from workplace violence are widely recognized to be 16 higher than reported levels, and that violence in health care settings has adverse impacts on workers and patients, compromising quality of care.
    • Stating that studies have found that proper staff training, staffing levels, resources, and evidence-based interventions can reduce the safety risks of patients and staff, using least-restrictive measures.
    • Stating that employer organizations have challenged the Occupational Health and Safety Administration's authority to utilize the General Duty Clause of a 1970 law (PL 109-236) governing workplace health and safety to enforce against workplace violence hazards.
    • Stating that the Occupational Health and Safety Administration's efforts to move forward with rulemaking have been halting, inconsistent, and slow, therefore legislation is necessary to prompt development of a standard to protect workers.

    It also would strike language:

    • Requiring the promulgation of the interim final standard on workplace violence prevention within one year of the bill's enactment.
    • Stating that requirements under a 1970 law (PL 109-236) governing workplace health and safety and other laws would not apply to the interim final standard.
    • Stating that if an interim final standard is not enacted, the provisions would be enforced in the same manner as any standard promulgated under the 1970 law.
    • Requiring the secretary of Labor to proposal a final standard on workplace violence protection within two years of the bill's enactment.
    • Language that would define the term "threat of violence" as a statement or conduct that causes a person to fear for their safety. It also would strike language that would define the term "dangerous weapon" as an instrument capable of inflicting death or serious bodily injury, regardless of whether it was designed for that purpose.

    It also would add a requirement for the Labor secretary to conduct an educational campaign for employees and employers before issuing the final standard on workplace violence prevention.

    It also would make other technical changes to the bill.

    Substitute amendment to the Courtney, D-Conn., substitute amendment that would strike language in the findings section:

    • Citing Bureau of Labor Statistics data on workplace violence rates in the health care and service industries compared to the average workplace.
    • Stating that due to under-reporting, actual injury rates 15 from workplace violence are widely recognized to be 16 higher than reported levels, and that violence in health care settings has adverse impacts on workers and patients, compromising quality of care.
    • Stating that studies have found that proper staff training, staffing levels, resources, and evidence-based interventions can reduce the safety risks of patients and staff, using least-restrictive measures.
    • Stating that employer organizations have challenged the Occupational Health and Safety Administration's authority to utilize the General Duty Clause of a 1970 law (PL 109-236) governing workplace health and safety to enforce against workplace violence hazards.
    • Stating that the Occupational Health and Safety Administration's efforts to move forward with rulemaking have been halting, inconsistent, and slow, therefore legislation is necessary to prompt development of a standard to protect workers.
    • It also would strike language:

    • Requiring the promulgation of the interim final standard on workplace violence prevention within one year of the bill's enactment.
    • Stating that requirements under a 1970 law (PL 109-236) governing workplace health and safety and other laws would not apply to the interim final standard.
    • Stating that if an interim final standard is not enacted, the provisions would be enforced in the same manner as any standard promulgated under the 1970 law.
    • Requiring the secretary of Labor to proposal a final standard on workplace violence protection within two years of the bill's enactment.
    • Language that would define the term "threat of violence" as a statement or conduct that causes a person to fear for their safety. It also would strike language that would define the term "dangerous weapon" as an instrument capable of inflicting death or serious bodily injury, regardless of whether it was designed for that purpose.
    • It also would add a requirement for the Labor secretary to conduct an educational campaign for employees and employers before issuing the final standard on workplace violence prevention.

      It also would make other technical changes to the bill.

      Rejected 20-25.

      June 11, 2019 — Committee Vote: Workplace Violence Prevention — Substitute Amendment
        Courtney, D-Conn. —

      Substitute amendment that would clarify that hazard recognition training for supervisors and managers should ensure that they can recognize high-risk situations and do not assign employees to situations that might compromise their safety.

      It also would remove the findings section of the bill and make minor technical changes.

      Substitute amendment that would clarify that hazard recognition training for supervisors and managers should ensure that they can recognize high-risk situations and do not assign employees to situations that might compromise their safety.

      It also would remove the findings section of the bill and make minor technical changes.

      Adopted by voice vote.

      June 11, 2019 — Committee Vote: Workplace Violence Prevention — Vote to Report

      Direct the secretary of Labor to issue an occupational health and safety standard requiring covered employers in the health care and social service industries to develop and implement a comprehensive workplace violence prevention plan.

      The bill would require the secretary, within a year of the bill's enactment, to issue an interim final standard on workplace violence prevention, based on the Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service Workers published in 2015 by the Labor Department's Occupational Health and Safety Administration.

      It would require that the interim standard take effect 30 days after being issued.

      The bill also would require the Labor secretary, within two years of the bill's enactment, to issue a proposed final standard on workplace violence prevention. Within 42 months of the bill's enactment, it would direct the secretary to issue a final standard containing the same required elements as the interim standard.

      The bill would require that the final standard provide as much as or more protection as any state plan approved by the secretary under a 1970 law (PL 109-236) governing workplace health and safety. It would require the standard to be as effective and enforceable as any standard promulgated under the 1970 law.

      The bill would require standards to direct covered employers, within six months of promulgation of the final standard, to develop and implement a workplace violence prevention plan.

      It would require that plans:

      • Be developed and implemented with the participation of employees, and, if applicable, collective bargaining representatives.
      • Be specific to hazards of the particular workplace and suitable to the workplaces operations.
      • Identify the individuals responsible for implementation.
      • Include reporting, incident response, and post-incident investigation procedures.
      • Include procedures for emergency response.
      • Be available at all times to covered employees.
      • Involve training and education for employees.
      • Involve the maintenance of public, accessible records, including a violent incident log.

      The bill would require covered employers to, by February 15 of every year, provide a report to the secretary of Labor on the frequency and severity of workplace violence as well as incident response and post-incident investigation. The bill would also require employers to conduct annual evaluations of the plan with their employees.

      Under the bill, each covered employer would have a policy prohibiting retaliation against employees for reporting an incident.

      As amended, the bill would:

      • Direct the secretary of Labor to, before issuing the interim final standard, provide notice in the Federal Register of the interim final standard and a 30-day period for public comment.
      • Clarify that hazard recognition training for supervisors and managers should ensure that they can recognize high-risk situations and do not assign employees to situations that might compromise their safety.

      Direct the secretary of Labor to issue an occupational health and safety standard requiring covered employers in the health care and social service industries to develop and implement a comprehensive workplace violence prevention plan.

      The bill would require the secretary, within a year of the bill's enactment, to issue an interim final standard on workplace violence prevention, based on the Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service Workers published in 2015 by the Labor Department's Occupational Health and Safety Administration.

      It would require that the interim standard take effect 30 days after being issued.

      The bill also would require the Labor secretary, within two years of the bill's enactment, to issue a proposed final standard on workplace violence prevention. Within 42 months of the bill's enactment, it would direct the secretary to issue a final standard containing the same required elements as the interim standard.

      The bill would require that the final standard provide as much as or more protection as any state plan approved by the secretary under a 1970 law (PL 109-236) governing workplace health and safety. It would require the standard to be as effective and enforceable as any standard promulgated under the 1970 law.

      The bill would require standards to direct covered employers, within six months of promulgation of the final standard, to develop and implement a workplace violence prevention plan.

      It would require that plans:

    • Be developed and implemented with the participation of employees, and, if applicable, collective bargaining representatives.
    • Be specific to hazards of the particular workplace and suitable to the workplaces operations.
    • Identify the individuals responsible for implementation.
    • Include reporting, incident response, and post-incident investigation procedures.
    • Include procedures for emergency response.
    • Be available at all times to covered employees.
    • Involve training and education for employees.
    • Involve the maintenance of public, accessible records, including a violent incident log.
    • The bill would require covered employers to, by February 15 of every year, provide a report to the secretary of Labor on the frequency and severity of workplace violence as well as incident response and post-incident investigation. The bill would also require employers to conduct annual evaluations of the plan with their employees.

      Under the bill, each covered employer would have a policy prohibiting retaliation against employees for reporting an incident.

      As amended, the bill would:

    • Direct the secretary of Labor to, before issuing the interim final standard, provide notice in the Federal Register of the interim final standard and a 30-day period for public comment.
    • Clarify that hazard recognition training for supervisors and managers should ensure that they can recognize high-risk situations and do not assign employees to situations that might compromise their safety.
    • Ordered reported favorably to the full House (As amended) 26-18.

  • June 10, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 4

    Bacon, (R-Neb.)Stevens, (D-Mich.)
    Cleaver (D-Mo.)Tlaib, (D-Mich.)
  • June 6, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Clay, (D-Mo.)Lowey, (D-N.Y.)Underwood, (D-Ill.)
  • June 5, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 4

    Perlmutter, (D-Colo.)Rouda, (D-Calif.)
    Price, (D-N.C.)Vela, (D-Texas)
  • June 4, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 4

    Carbajal, (D-Calif.)Welch, (D-Vt.)
    Lee, (D-Nev.)Yarmuth, (D-Ky.)
  • June 3, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 4

    Crow, (D-Colo.)Kelly, R. (D-Ill.)
    Heck, (D-Wash.)Speier, (D-Calif.)
  • May 28, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 9

    Aguilar, (D-Calif.)Cartwright, (D-Pa.)Larsen, R. (D-Wash.)
    Beatty, (D-Ohio)Cox, (D-Calif.)Murphy, S. (D-Fla.)
    Bera, (D-Calif.)Kildee, (D-Mich.)Van Drew, (D-N.J.)
  • May 23, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Castro, (D-Texas)Meeks, (D-N.Y.)Smith, Adam (D-Wash.)
  • May 22, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Green, A. (D-Texas)Phillips, (D-Minn.)
  • May 21, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Kirkpatrick, (D-Ariz.)
  • May 20, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 7

    Bass, (D-Calif.)Garcia, (D-Ill.)Tonko, (D-N.Y.)
    DelBene, (D-Wash.)Gonzalez, (D-Texas)
    Fitzpatrick, (R-Pa.)Krishnamoorthi, (D-Ill.)
  • May 17, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Cooper, (D-Tenn.)
  • May 16, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 7

    Castor, (D-Fla.)Rice, K. (D-N.Y.)Watson Coleman, (D-N.J.)
    Demings, (D-Fla.)Soto, (D-Fla.)
    Kennedy, Joseph P. (D-Mass.)Spanberger, (D-Va.)
  • May 15, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Doggett, (D-Texas)Titus, (D-Nev.)
  • May 14, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 9

    Barragan, (D-Calif.)Jackson Lee, (D-Texas)Quigley, (D-Ill.)
    Foster, (D-Ill.)Lawson, (D-Fla.)Sarbanes, (D-Md.)
    Gallego, (D-Ariz.)Loebsack, (D-Iowa)Trahan, (D-Mass.)
  • May 10, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Dingell, (D-Mich.)Serrano, (D-N.Y.)Waters, Maxine (D-Calif.)
  • May 9, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 10

    Brown, A. (D-Md.)Hastings, (D-Fla.)Lieu, (D-Calif.)
    Clark, K. (D-Mass.)Jeffries, (D-N.Y.)Ruppersberger, (D-Md.)
    Finkenauer, (D-Iowa)Johnson, E.B. (D-Texas)
    Gomez, (D-Calif.)Kim, (D-N.J.)
  • May 1, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 7

    Axne, (D-Iowa)Kuster, (D-N.H.)Pascrell (D-N.J.)
    Blunt Rochester, (D-Del.)Morelle, (D-N.Y.)
    Cardenas, (D-Calif.)Neguse, (D-Colo.)
  • April 29, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 14

    Boyle, (D-Pa.)Malinowski, (D-N.J.)Rush, (D-Ill.)
    Bustos, (D-Ill.)Mucarsel-Powell, (D-Fla.)Schrier, (D-Wash.)
    Chu, (D-Calif.)Norcross, (D-N.J.)Scott, D. (D-Ga.)
    Harder, (D-Calif.)Roybal-Allard, (D-Calif.)Trone, (D-Md.)
    Kaptur, (D-Ohio)Ruiz, (D-Calif.)
  • April 18, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 6

    Cicilline, (D-R.I.)Johnson, H. (D-Ga.)McGovern, (D-Mass.)
    Davis, D. (D-Ill.)Lynch, (D-Mass.)Payne (D-N.J.)
  • April 15, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Golden, (D-Maine)Higgins, B. (D-N.Y.)Langevin, (D-R.I.)
  • April 12, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Brownley, (D-Calif.)Stefanik, (R-N.Y.)
  • April 9, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Crist, (D-Fla.)Slotkin, (D-Mich.)
  • April 8, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Pappas, (D-N.H.)Sanchez, (D-Calif.)
  • April 2, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 6

    Blumenauer, (D-Ore.)Cisneros, (D-Calif.)Shalala, (D-Fla.)
    Case, (D-Hawaii)Lawrence, (D-Mich.)Thompson, B. (D-Miss.)
  • March 29, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Carson, (D-Ind.)
  • March 25, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Lowenthal, (D-Calif.)Maloney, S.P. (D-N.Y.)Rose, (D-N.Y.)
  • March 13, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 4

    Craig, (D-Minn.)Meng, (D-N.Y.)
    Grijalva, (D-Ariz.)Scanlon, (D-Pa.)
  • March 12, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Pressley, (D-Mass.)
  • March 11, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 4

    Hayes, (D-Conn.)Ryan, T. (D-Ohio)
    Moore, (D-Wis.)Visclosky, (D-Ind.)
  • March 8, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Hill, (D-Calif.)
  • March 7, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Dean, (D-Pa.)Fudge, (D-Ohio)
  • March 5, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 9

    Cohen, (D-Tenn.)Lofgren, (D-Calif.)Napolitano, (D-Calif.)
    DeFazio, (D-Ore.)McBath, (D-Ga.)Sablan, (I-N. Marianas)
    DeLauro, (D-Conn.)Moulton, (D-Mass.)Vargas, (D-Calif.)
  • Feb. 27, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Lee, B. (D-Calif.)
  • Feb. 26, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 6

    Davis, S. (D-Calif.)Levin, (D-Mich.)Takano, (D-Calif.)
    Jayapal, (D-Wash.)Porter, (D-Calif.)Wasserman Schultz, (D-Fla.)
  • Feb. 19, 2019 — Original cosponsor(s): 26

    Adams, (D-N.C.)Khanna, (D-Calif.)Pocan, (D-Wis.)
    Bonamici, (D-Ore.)Larson, J. (D-Conn.)Raskin, (D-Md.)
    Clarke, Y. (D-N.Y.)Lipinski, (D-Ill.)Schakowsky, (D-Ill.)
    DeSaulnier, (D-Calif.)McCollum, (D-Minn.)Scott, R. (D-Va.)
    Engel, (D-N.Y.)Norton, (D-D.C.)Sires, (D-N.J.)
    Espaillat, (D-N.Y.)Ocasio-Cortez, (D-N.Y.)Velazquez, (D-N.Y.)
    Garamendi, (D-Calif.)Omar, (D-Minn.)Wild, (D-Pa.)
    Haaland, (D-N.M.)Peterson, (D-Minn.)Wilson, F. (D-Fla.)
    Himes, (D-Conn.)Pingree, (D-Maine)
  • Feb. 19, 2019 — Read twice and referred to: House Education and Labor, House Energy and Commerce, House Ways and Means.Congressional Record p. H2042