Federal - HR 5

A bill to support State and local accountability for public education, protect State and local authority, inform parents of the performance of their children's schools, and for other purposes.

Introduced

February 3, 2015

Description

A bill to support State and local accountability for public education, protect State and local authority, inform parents of the performance of their children's schools, and for other purposes.

Our Position

Oppose

Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 11

Latest Actions See More/Less

  • Nov. 16, 2015Waters, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.93, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1627

  • Oct. 20, 2015McNerney, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.93, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1491

  • July 15, 2015Lofgren, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.423, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1072-E1073

  • July 15, 2015Lofgren, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.422, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1072-E1073

  • July 15, 2015Lofgren, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.421, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1072-E1073

  • July 15, 2015Lofgren, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.420, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1072-E1073

  • July 15, 2015Lofgren, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.419, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1072-E1073

  • July 15, 2015Lofgren, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.418, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1072-E1073

  • July 15, 2015Lofgren, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.417, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1072-E1073

  • July 15, 2015Lofgren, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.416, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1072-E1073

  • July 15, 2015Lofgren, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.415, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1072-E1073

  • July 15, 2015Lofgren, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.414, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1072-E1073

  • July 15, 2015Lofgren, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.413, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1072-E1073

  • July 15, 2015Lofgren, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.412, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1072-E1073

  • July 15, 2015Lofgren, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.411, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1072-E1073

  • July 15, 2015Lofgren, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.410, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1072-E1073

  • July 15, 2015Lofgren, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.392, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1072-E1073

  • July 13, 2015 — Received in the Senate and placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar. Congressional Record p. S5005

  • July 9, 2015Hurt, R-Va., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.417, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E1023

  • July 8, 2015Sherman, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.423, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H4935

  • July 8, 2015Sherman, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.422, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H4934

  • July 8, 2015Cuellar, D-Texas, House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.419, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H4931

  • July 8, 2015R. Davis, R-Ill., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.411, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H4926

  • July 8, 2015J. Miller, R-Fla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.392, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H4899

  • July 8, 2015House Vote 423 Elementary and Secondary Education Act Overhaul — Passage
    Passage of the bill, as amended, that would reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) and would make fundamental changes to many of its programs through Fiscal 2019. The bill would allow Title I funding to follow individual students to other schools, and eliminates more than 65 elementary and secondary education programs and merges their funding. In addition, the new Title I block grant would give states greater flexibility in how funds are used. It would also allow states to establish their own teacher evaluation systems tied to student achievement. The bill would also reauthorize and expand the charter school program and includes other provisions to increase parental choice. Passed 218-213. Note: A "nay" was a vote in support of the president's position. Congressional Record p. H4934

  • July 8, 2015House Vote 421 Elementary and Secondary Education Act Overhauls — Substitute Amendment
    Scott, D-Va., substitute amendment that would require states to establish college-and career-ready standards in English, math and science for grades K-12 and high-quality assessments aligned to those standards. The amendment would also require state education plans for youth in juvenile institutions, require districts to include teacher salaries in their calculations for Title I funds and require states and districts to publicly report progress in making funding equitable. Furthermore, the amendment would reauthorize and modify the Charter School Program similar to those in HR 5 and create programs for STEM education and literacy from preschool through grade 12, as well as grants for technology infrastructure and for nongovernmental entities to develop curricula in various subject matters. Finally, it would authorize grants to states for high-quality preschool programs and increase authorizations for Native Indian, Hawaiian and Alaska Native education programs, as well as for the education of homeless children and youth. Rejected 187-244. Congressional Record p. H4932

  • July 8, 2015House Vote 420 Elementary and Secondary Education Act Overhaul — Student Assessment Opt Out Provision
    Salmon, R-Ariz., amendment that would allow parents to opt a student out of the required assessments for any reason. Students whose parents opt them out would not be included when calculating the participation rate in the assessment. Adopted 251-178. Congressional Record p. H4931

  • July 8, 2015House Vote 419 Elementary And Secondary Education Act Overhaul — Block Grants
    Walker, R-N.C., amendment that would allow states to receive federal education funds in the form of a block grant to be used for any education purpose under state law. States operating under a block grant must assess student achievement and must disseminate disaggregated student performance data. The amendment would also require that a state receiving federal education funds as a block grant must ensure that private schools receive an equitable portion of that funding. Rejected 195-235. Congressional Record p. H4930-H4931

  • July 8, 2015House Vote 418 Elementary And Secondary Education Act Overhaul — Racial, Ethnic and Disability Student Impact
    Thompson, D-Miss., amendment that would prohibit the bill from being enacted until the Education Department determines that its enactment will not reduce the college and career readiness of racial or ethnic minority students, students with disabilities, English learners and low-income students and the department provides written notification to Congress on such determination. Rejected 189-241. Congressional Record p. H4930

  • July 8, 2015House Vote 417 Elementary and Secondary Education Act Overhaul — Early Childhood Education
    Meng, D-N.Y., amendment that would create a program under which the Education Department would provide grants for early childhood education scholarships, professional development and licensing credentials, or increased compensation for educators who have attained specific qualifications. The amendment would also require each state that applies for a grant to include in its application a description of its comprehensive early childhood professional development system, and grant recipients must maintain their fiscal effort for the activities supported by the grant funds for a fiscal year at levels equal to or greater than their fiscal effort for such activities during the preceding fiscal year. Rejected 205-224. Congressional Record p. H4929

  • July 8, 2015House Vote 416 Elementary And Secondary Education Act Overhaul — Digital Learning
    Loebsack, D-Iowa, amendment that would support the expansion of the use of digital learning through the creation of a competitive grant program to partnerships to implement and evaluate the results of technology-based learning practices, strategies, tools or programs at rural schools. Adopted 218-213. Congressional Record p. H4928-H4929

  • July 8, 2015House Vote 415 Elementary and Secondary Education Act Overhaul — Biliteracy Grant Program
    Brownley, D-Calif., that would create a grant program for states to create or expand biliteracy seal programs to recognize student proficiency in speaking, reading and writing in both English and a second language for graduating high school seniors. Rejected 191-239. Congressional Record p. H4928

  • July 8, 2015House Vote 414 Elementary And Secondary Education Act Overhaull — Student Learning Developments
    Carson, D-Ind., amendment that would require the Education Department to develop a national strategy for elementary and secondary school education that includes advancing an annual measure of student learning, including a system of assessments; effective teacher preparation and continuing professional development; education administration; and international comparisons of education. Rejected 186-245. Congressional Record p. H4927-H4928

  • July 8, 2015House Vote 413 Elementary And Secondary Education Act Overhaul — School Dropout Prevention
    Wilson, D-Fla., that would provide for school dropout prevention and re-entry and would provide grants to raise academic achievement levels for all students. Rejected 192-237. Congressional Record p. H4926-H4927

  • July 8, 2015House Vote 412 Elementary And Secondary Education Act Overhaul — School Start Times
    Grayson, D-Fla., that would require the Education Department to conduct an assessment of the impact of school start times on student health, well-being and performance. Rejected 199-228. Congressional Record p. H4926

  • July 8, 2015House Vote 411 Elementary And Secondary Education Act Overhaul — Student Privacy
    Hurd, R-Texas amendment that would express the sense of Congress that the Education Department should review all regulations addressing issues of student privacy and ensure that students' personally identifiable information is protected. Adopted 424-2. Congressional Record p. H4925

  • July 8, 2015House Vote 410 Elementary and Secondary Education Act Overhaul — Common Core
    Zeldin, R-N.Y., amendment that would allow a state to withdraw from the Common Core Standards or any other specific standards. Adopted 373-57. Congressional Record p. H4924-H4925

  • July 8, 2015 — Committee of the Whole amendment agreed to by voice vote. Congressional Record p. H4932

  • July 8, 2015 — Polis, D-Colo., amendment no. 48, to require states to have college-ready and career-ready standards and set performance, growth, and graduation rate targets for all student subgroups, withdrawn by unanimous consent. Congressional Record p. H4913-H4924

  • July 8, 2015 — Rokita, R-Ind., amendment no. 45, to authorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as revised by the bill, for fiscal years 2016-2019, adopted by voice vote. Congressional Record p. H4908-H4910

  • July 8, 2015 — Considered by the House. Congressional Record p. H4908-H4935

  • July 8, 2015House Vote 392 Education and National Forrest Management Overhaul — Rule
    Adoption of the resolution (H Res 347) that would make in order a bill (HR 5) that would generally reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 through FY 2021, including the Title I program that distributes funding to schools and school districts that have a high percentage of students from low-income families and a bill (HR 2647) that would modify federal forest management practices to increase timber production on U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands as a means of promoting greater forest health and reducing wildfires. Adopted 242-185. Congressional Record p. H4887

  • July 7, 2015 — Rules Committee resolution, H Res 347, reported to the House as a rule for HR 5.

  • July 7, 2015 — House Rules Committee granted a structured rule providing for consideration of the bill.

  • April 15, 2015Long, R-Mo., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.99, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E498

  • April 15, 2015Long, R-Mo., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.98, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E498

  • April 15, 2015Long, R-Mo., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.97, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E498

  • April 15, 2015Long, R-Mo., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.96, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E498

  • April 15, 2015Long, R-Mo., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.95, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E498

  • April 15, 2015Long, R-Mo., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.93, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E497

  • April 15, 2015Long, R-Mo., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.92, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E497

  • April 15, 2015Long, R-Mo., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.91, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E497

  • April 15, 2015Long, R-Mo., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.87, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E498

  • April 15, 2015Long, R-Mo., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.86, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E498

  • Feb. 27, 2015B. Lee, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.99, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E275

  • Feb. 27, 2015B. Lee, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.98, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E275

  • Feb. 27, 2015B. Lee, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.97, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E275

  • Feb. 27, 2015B. Lee, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.96, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E275

  • Feb. 27, 2015B. Lee, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.95, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E275

  • Feb. 27, 2015Hurt, R-Va., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.99, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E274

  • Feb. 27, 2015Hurt, R-Va., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.98, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E274

  • Feb. 27, 2015Hurt, R-Va., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.97, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E274

  • Feb. 27, 2015Hurt, R-Va., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.96, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E274

  • Feb. 27, 2015Hurt, R-Va., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.95, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E274

  • Feb. 27, 2015Adrian Smith, R-Neb., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.98, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E272

  • Feb. 27, 2015Roe, R-Tenn., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.99, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H1386

  • Feb. 27, 2015Roe, R-Tenn., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.98, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H1386

  • Feb. 27, 2015Roe, R-Tenn., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.97, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H1386

  • Feb. 27, 2015Roe, R-Tenn., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.96, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H1386

  • Feb. 27, 2015Roe, R-Tenn., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.95, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H1386

  • Feb. 27, 2015 — Scott, D-Va., substitute amendment no. 44, to require states to establish college- and career-ready standards in English, math and science for grades K-12 and high-quality assessments aligned to those standards, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1394-H1483

  • Feb. 27, 2015 — Thompson, D-Miss., amendment no. 43, to prohibit the bill from being enacted until the Education Department determines that its enactment will not reduce the college and career readiness of racial or ethnic minority students, students with disabilities, English learners and low-income students, and to require written notification to Congress on such determination, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1393-H1394

  • Feb. 27, 2015 — Considered by the House. Congressional Record p. H1393-H1483

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Polis, D-Colo., for Meng, D-N.Y., amendment no. 41, to create a program under which the Education Department would provide grants for: early-childhood education scholarships, professional development and licensing credentials, or increased compensation for educators who have attained specific qualifications, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1297-H1299

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Loebsack, D-Iowa, amendment no. 40, to support the expansion of the use of digital learning through the creation of a competitive grant program to partnerships to implement and evaluate the results of technology-based learning practices, strategies, tools or programs at rural schools, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1295-H1297

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Brownley, D-Calif., amendment no. 39, to create a grant program for states to create or expand biliteracy seal programs to recognize student proficiency in speaking, reading and writing in both English and a second language for graduating high school seniors, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1293-H1295

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Flores, R-Texas, amendment no. 38 to express the sense of Congress that students, teachers and schools administrators have the right to free exercise of religion and that schools should examine their policies to ensure students and teachers are fully able to participate in activities on school grounds related to their religious freedom, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1292-H1293

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Dold, R-Ill., amendment no. 37, to prohibit any funds received under ESEA from being used to make contributions to teacher pension programs in excess of the "normal cost" of any teacher's participation in the pension program, adopted by voice. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1291-H1292

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Collins, R-Ga., amendment no. 36, to require that the Education Department ensure each grant recipient is aware of their responsibility to comply with all monitoring requirements, to monitor any subgrantees, the department's monitoring schedule and any other compliance reviews, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1291

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Carson, D-Ind., amendment no. 35. to require the Education Department to develop a national strategy for elementary and secondary school education that includes advancing an annual measure of student learning, including a system of assessments, effective teacher preparation and continuing professional development, education administration and international comparisons of education, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1290-H1291

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Castro, D-Texas, amendment no. 34, to require states to include in their state plans for the education of homeless youth a description of how such youth would receive assistance from counselors to advise, prepare and improve college readiness, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1289-H1290

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Wilson, D-Fla., amendment no. 33, to provide for school dropout prevention and reentry and would provide grants to raise academic achievement levels for all students, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1286-H1289

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Grayson, D-Fla. amendment no. 32, to require the Education Department to conduct an assessment of the impact of school start times on student health, well-being and performance, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1286

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Hurd, R-Texas, amendment no. 31, to express the sense of Congress that the Education Department should review all regulations addressing issues of student privacy and ensure that students' personally identifiable information is protected, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1285

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Zeldin, R-N.Y., amendment no. 30, to allow a state to withdraw from the Common Core Standards or any other specific standards, pending at recess. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1283-H1285

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Davis, D-Calif., amendment no. 29, to clarify the definition of "school leader" to refer to a leader who works at the school, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1283

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Nolan, D-Minn., amendment no. 28, to include language with respect to the Indian Education statement of policy that the United States ensures that American Indian children do not attend school in buildings that are dilapidated or deteriorating, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1281-H1283

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Courtney, D-Conn., amendment no. 27, to modify current law to increase the weight of non-federally connected children that reside in public-private venture housing located on military property for the purposes of Impact Aid basic support payment calculations, withdrawn by unanimous consent. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1281

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Wilson, D-Fla., amendment no. 26, to deem intensive care reading labs and specialization of school staffing to improve basic skills in language arts, mathematics and science in grades 1-3 as allowable uses in block grant funding, rejected by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1280-H1281

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Jackson Lee, D-Texas, amendment no. 25, to support accountability-based programs and activities that are designed to increase school safety, including research-based bullying prevention, cyberbullying prevention, disruption of recruitment activity by groups or individuals involved in violent extremism, and gang prevention and bullying prevention programs, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1279-H1280

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Polis, D-Colo., amendment no. 24, to allow grants to be used for the creation and distribution of open access textbooks and open educational resources, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1278-H1279

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Bonamici, D-Ore., amendment no. 23, to allow states to use Local Academic Flexible Grant funds to audit and streamline assessment systems, eliminate unnecessary assessments and improve the use of assessments, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1276-H1278

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Kelly, D-Ill., amendment no. 22, to require Statewide Family Engagement Centers to conduct training programs in the community to improve adult literacy, including financial literacy, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1276

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Polis, D-Colo., amendment no. 21, to encourage collaboration and sharing of best practices between charter schools and local education agencies, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1275-H1276

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Polis, D-Colo., for Messer, R-Ind., amendment no. 20, to express the sense of Congress that charter schools are a critical part of our education system and that Congress must support opening more quality charter schools to help students succeed, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1274-H1275

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Wilson, D-Fla., for Duffy, R-Wis., amendment no. 19, to require school districts to be transparent in providing information to parents at the beginning of the school year on mandated assessments the student will have to take during the school year and any school district policy on assessment participation, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1274

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Cohen, D-Tenn., amendment no. 18, to allow for Title II funds to be used for restorative justice and conflict resolution training, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1273-H1274

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Clark, D-Mass., amendment no. 17, to clarify that early childhood education-focused professional development is an acceptable use of Title II funds, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1272-H1273

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Jeffries, D-N.Y., amendment no. 16, to clarify that teachers, parents and other educational professionals receive education on the harms of copyright piracy in order to further educate students to that end, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1271-H1272

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Delaney, D-Md., amendment no. 15, to make Pay For Success initiatives an allowable use of funds for state and local educational agencies, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1270-1271

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — McKinley, R-W.Va., amendment no. 14, to require states, in their applications for federal funding to support teachers, to describe subjects they identify as "workforce critical subjects," adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1265-H1266

  • Feb. 26, 2015House Vote 99 Education Law Overhaul — Title II Funding Determination
    Moore, D-Wis., amendment that would delay implementation of the new formula for Title II funding until the Education secretary determines that the implementation will not reduce funding for schools serving high percentages of students in poverty. Rejected in Committee of the Whole 185-239. Congressional Record p. H1264-H1265, H1270

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Davis, R-Ill., amendment no. 12, to add language clarifying that nothing in Title I alters or affects the rights, remedies and procedures afforded to school and local educational agency employees under federal, state or local laws or under the terms of collective bargaining agreements or other agreements between employers and their employees, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1263-H1264

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — DeSaulnier, D-Calif., amendment no. 11, to require local education agencies and school districts to develop agreements with Head Start and other agencies to carry out early childhood education activities, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1263

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Fudge, D-Ohio, amendment no. 10, to require states to demonstrate that the level of state and local funding remains constant from year to year and require states to reduce funds to local educational agencies that fail to maintain 90 percent of the previous year's funding, except under exceptional circumstances, withdrawn by unanimous consent. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1262-H1263

  • Feb. 26, 2015House Vote 98 Education Law Overhaul — Qualifications for Paraprofessionals
    Quigley, D-Ill., amendment that would maintain the required qualifications for paraprofessionals in current law. Adopted in Committee of the Whole 218-201. Congressional Record p. H1261-H1262, H1269

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Barletta, R-Pa., amendment no. 8, to require school districts that use Title I funding for after-school, before-school or summer school activities to describe those activities in their grant application plans, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1260-H1261

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Langevin, D-R.I., amendment no. 7, to require states applying for funds under Title I to show how they would use the funds to provide apprenticeships that offer academic credit and how they would use the funds to provide comprehensive career counseling to the students, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1259-H1260

  • Feb. 26, 2015House Vote 97 Education Law Overhaul — K-12 Textbook Ombudsman
    Castro, D-Texas, amendment that would appoint a neutral ombudsman within the Education Department to ensure K-12 textbooks are held to high academic standards. Rejected in Committee of the Whole 182-243. Congressional Record p. H1259, H1268

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Goodlatte, R-Va., amendment no. 5, to authorize states to allow local educational agencies (LEA) to administer their own, locally-designed academic assessment system, in place of the state-designed academic system as long as the LEA obtains approval from the state, the assessments provide data comparable to all LEAs in the state and the assessment system meets the state requirements for assessments, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1257-H1259

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Lawrence, D-Mich., amendment no. 4, to add students in foster care as a category under which states and local educational agencies must report disaggregated data, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1257

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Meeks, D-N.Y., amendment no. 3, to require that the annual, statewide assessments measure student growth and require that student growth be a component of achievement within the accountability system established by a given state, withdrawn by unanimous consent. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H1256-H1257

  • Feb. 26, 2015House Vote 96 Education Law Overhaul — Reauthorization Length
    Grothman, R-Wis., amendment that would decrease the length of the bill's reauthorization of existing elementary and secondary education law from fiscal 2021 to fiscal 2018 Rejected in Committee of the Whole 114-311. Congressional Record p. H1255-H1256, H1267

  • Feb. 26, 2015House Vote 95 Education Law Overhaul — STEM Gateways Grant Program
    Kennedy, D-Mass., amendment that would authorize the STEM Gateways grant program as an allowable use of flexible funding received by state educational agencies. States could award grants to local educational agencies and qualified partner organizations to support the success of women, minorities, and low-income students in rigorous STEM academics. Rejected in Committee of the Whole 204-217. Congressional Record p. H1253-H1255, H1267

  • Feb. 26, 2015 — Considered by the House. Congressional Record p. H1193-H1266, H1266-H1285, H1285-H1299

  • Feb. 26, 2015House Vote 93 Education Law Overhaul — Rule
    Adoption of the rule that would provide for further House floor consideration of the bill (HR 5) that would reauthorize and overhaul current elementary and secondary education law through fiscal 2021. Adopted 234-184. Congressional Record p. H1192

  • Feb. 26, 2015House Vote 92 Education Law Overhaul — Previous Question
    Foxx, R-N.C., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 125) that would provide for further House floor consideration of the bill (HR 5) that would reauthorize and overhaul current elementary and secondary education law through fiscal 2021. Motion agreed to 234-177. Congressional Record p. H1191-H1192

  • Feb. 26, 2015House Vote 91 Education Law Overhaul — Question of Consideration
    Question of whether the House should consider the rule (H Res 125) that would provide for further House floor consideration of the bill (HR 5) that would reauthorize and overhaul current elementary and secondary education law through fiscal 2021. Agreed to consider 224-167. Note: Polis, D-Colo., had raised a point of order that the rule would violate clause clause 426(a) of the Congressional Budget Act, regarding unfunded mandates. Congressional Record p. H1182

  • Feb. 25, 2015 — Rules Committee resolution, H Res 125, reported to the House as a rule for HR 5.

  • Feb. 25, 2015 — Considered by the House. Congressional Record p. H1142-H1150

  • Feb. 25, 2015House Vote 87 Education Law Overhaul and Savings Plan — Rule
    Adoption of the rule that would provide for House floor consideration of the bill (HR 529) that would permanently expand the use of "529" educational savings plans and the bill (HR 5) that would reauthorize and overhaul current elementary and secondary education law through fiscal 2021. Adopted 243-178. Congressional Record p. H1134

  • Feb. 25, 2015House Vote 86 Education Law Overhaul and Savings Plan — Previous Question
    Woodall, R-Ga., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 121) that would provide for House floor consideration of the bill (HR 529) that would permanently expand the use of "529" educational savings plans and the bill (HR 5) that would reauthorize and overhaul current elementary and secondary education law through fiscal 2021. Motion agreed to 241-181. Congressional Record p. H1133-H1134

  • Feb. 25, 2015Statement of Administration Policy issued by Office of Management and Budget.

  • Feb. 25, 2015 — House Rules Committee granted a structured rule providing for further consideration of the bill. Congressional Record p. H1161, H1162, D178

  • Feb. 25, 2015 — Rules Committee vote: Rule for Amendment Consideration for HR 5, Elementary and Secondary Education-Vote to Report
    Ordered reported favorably to the full House by voice vote.

  • Feb. 25, 2015 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Rules Committee.

    Feb. 25, 2015 — Committee Vote: Rule for Amendment Consideration of HR 5, Elementary and Secondary Education — Open Rule
    Hastings, D-Fla. —

    Amendment that would provide an open rule for HR 5, a bill that would reauthorize and consolidate elementary and secondary education programs and allow Title I funds to follow students as they transfer among public and charter schools.

    Rejected 2-5.

    Feb. 25, 2015 — Committee Vote: Rule for Amendment Consideration for HR 5, Elementary and Secondary Education — Democratic Amendments
    Polis, D-Colo. —

    Amendment to the rule that would make in order consideration of four Democratic amendments, from:

    • Lucille Roybal-Allard, of California, that would require 40 percent of funding for blended learning programs to be used for professional development in technology.
    • Polis, of Colorado, that would require states to work with charter schools to resolve access issues to charter schools, including transportation concerns.
    • Polis that would delay implementation of the act until the Education Department certifies that removing a cap on the number of students with disabilities taking alternative assessments will not lower academic standards for those students.
    • Polis that would prohibit programs that receive money under the bill from discriminating based on a student’s sexual orientation or gender identity.
    • Rejected 2-5.

      Feb. 25, 2015 — Committee Vote: Rule for Amendment Consideration for HR 5, Elementary and Secondary Education — Vote to Report

      Provide a structured rule for consideration of HR 5, a bill that would reauthorize and consolidate elementary and secondary education programs and allow Title I funds to follow students as they transfer among public and charter schools.

      The rule would make in order 44 amendments, debatable in the order listed in the rule and for the amount of time allotted in the rule, equally divided between the sponsor and an opponent. Amendment sponsors would be able to withdraw their amendments anytime before they are considered on the floor.

      All points of order against the amendments would be waived.

      Ordered reported favorably to the full House by voice vote.

  • Feb. 24, 2015 — Rules Committee resolution, H Res 121, reported to the House as a rule for HR 5.

  • Feb. 24, 2015 — House Rules Committee granted, by voice vote, a general debate rule providing for consideration of the bill. Congressional Record p. H1102, D169

  • Feb. 24, 2015 — Rules Committee vote: Rule for Floor Consideration of HR 529, College Savings Accounts, and HR 5, Elementary and Secondary Education-Vote to Report
    Ordered reported favorably to the full House by voice vote.

  • Feb. 24, 2015 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Rules Committee.

    Feb. 24, 2015 — Committee Vote: Rule for Floor Consideration of HR 529, College Savings Accounts, and HR 5, Elementary and Secondary Education — Tax Savings Income Limit
    L. Slaughter, D-N.Y. —

    Amendment that would make in order an amendment by Danny K. Davis, D-Ill., that would limit tax exemptions on 529 plans to those making less than $3 million annually.

    Rejected 4-6.

    Feb. 24, 2015 — Committee Vote: Rule for Floor Consideration of HR 529, College Savings Accounts, and HR 5, Elementary and Secondary Education — Open Rule
    McGovern, D-Mass. —

    Amendment that would provide an open rule for HR 5, a bill that would reauthorize and consolidate elementary and secondary education programs and allow Title I funds to follow low-income students as they transfer among public and charter schools.

    Rejected by voice vote.

    Feb. 24, 2015 — Committee Vote: Rule for Floor Consideration of HR 529, College Savings Accounts, and HR 5, Elementary and Secondary Education — Vote to Report

    Provide a closed rule for HR 529, which would permanently allow money in tax-free 529 college savings accounts to be used for computers and software and would exempt from taxes any returned tuition funds if that money is refunded to the savings plan.

    The resolution would make in order one motion to recommit, with or without instructions, and would provide one hour of debate equally divided. It would waive any points of order against provisions in the bill.

    The rule also would provide for one hour of debate for HR 5, which would reauthorize and consolidate elementary and secondary education programs and allow Title I funds to follow low-income students as they transfer among public and charter schools. It would make in order one motion to recommit, with or without instructions, and would waive any points of order against provisions in the bill. The Rules panel will meet again at a later date to consider which amendments to make in order to the bill.

    Additionally, the rule would waive a requirement that two-thirds of members vote to allow consideration of a rule on the floor the same day it is reported by the Rules Committee. That waiver would apply only to bills to fund the Homeland Security Department considered on or before the legislative day of March 2. It also would allow the speaker to consider motions to suspend the rules for a Homeland Security funding measure through the calendar day of March 1.

    Ordered reported favorably to the full House by voice vote.
  • Feb. 20, 2015 — House Financial Services Committee discharged and placed on the Union Calendar. Congressional Record p. H1084

  • Feb. 20, 2015 — Reported to the House by the House Education and the Workforce Committee and placed on the Union Calendar. H Rept 114-24, Pt. 1Congressional Record p. H1084

  • Feb. 20, 2015 — Additional cosponsor(s): 10

    Allen, (R-Ga.)Guthrie, (R-Ky.)Roe, (R-Tenn.)
    Byrne, (R-Ala.)Heck, J. (R-Nev.)Sessions, P. (R-Texas)
    Curbelo, (R-Fla.)Hunter, (R-Calif.)
    Foxx, (R-N.C.)Messer, (R-Ind.)
  • Feb. 19, 2015Cost Estimate issued by Congressional Budget Office.

  • Feb. 11, 2015 — Education & the Workforce Committee vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization-Vote to Report
    Ordered reported favorably to the full House (as amended) 21-16.

  • Feb. 11, 2015 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Education and the Workforce Committee.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — Title III
      Hinojosa, D-Texas —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would reinstate Title III of the law that provides specific funding and programs for English language learners and would authorize $1 billion for programs in the title annually.

    Rejected by voice vote.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — Student Data Privacy
      Russell, R-Okla. —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would prohibit the use of "personal, private" student data for purposes other than assessing student performance and would clarify that all individual data would be protected by school districts and only aggregate data could be sent to the Education Department.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — Military Students
      J. Heck, R-Nev. —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would require states and schools to report on the performance of children who have parents in the armed forces.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act — Private Schools
      Messer, R-Ind. —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would allow Title I funds to be used at private schools.

    Withdrawn.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act — School Accountability
      Polis, D-Colo. —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would require states to set goals for school performance, including high school graduation rates, and use "evidence-based" interventions in poor performing schools. Persistently low-performing schools, those that are among the worst-rated for five years in a row, could be subject to state takeover or closure. States also would have to adopt "college- and career-ready" standards in reading, math and science that are either approved by the state higher education system or have been voluntarily adopted in a number of other states.

    Rejected by voice vote.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — State Occupational Regulations
      Walberg, R-Mich. —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would require the Education Department to withhold funding from states until they enact a law that commits to imposing occupational regulations or licensing requirements only when necessary to protect public health and safety. It would withhold 1 percent of Title I funds from states that fail to limit occupational licenses.

    Withdrawn.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — Innovation Grants
      Sablan, D-N. Marianas —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would permanently authorize the Investing in Innovation competitive grant program. It would authorize $500 million for the grants in fiscal 2016 and such sums as necessary for the next five years.

    Rejected by voice vote.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — District Block Grants
      Grothman, R-Wis. —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would require funds in the local academic flexible grant be given first to states, and then to school districts, based on student population.

    Withdrawn.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — Testing
      Bonamici, D-Ore. —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would provide grants to states to work to improve existing test systems to better align the exams with curriculum and to audit existing tests given both by the state and school districts and eliminate duplicative tests.

    Withdrawn.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — Literacy Programs
      Pocan, D-Wis. —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would give grants to states to create and implement literacy programs. States could sub-grant funds to school districts or public or private organizations to provide literacy services for preschool and kindergarten children. It would authorize $500 million for the grants in fiscal 2016 and such sums as necessary in subsequent years.

    Rejected by voice vote.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act — LGBT Discrimination
      Foxx, R-N.C. —

    Motion to table (kill) the Polis, D-Colo., motion to appeal the ruling of the chair that the Polis amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute is not germane to the underlying bill.

    The Polis amendment would prohibit schools receiving money under the bill from discriminating against students based on their sexual orientation or gender identity. It would allow those who have faced this prohibited discrimination to bring lawsuits, including against states.

    Agreed to 21-15.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — Teacher Training
      S. Davis, D-Calif. —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would set standards for teacher qualifications, including college degrees and mastery of a subject area. It would authorize $3.5 billion for teacher training. It also would amend the Higher Education Act to require teacher training partnership grants to be targeted to programs that target high-need school districts or top-performing alternative certification programs. The amendment also would require teacher training programs to make publicly available a variety of data about program graduates, including teachers' success, as judged by evidence of student learning, three-year retention rate and the percentage of program graduates that teach in high-need schools.

    Rejected 16-21.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — STEM Programs
      Courtney, D-Conn. —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would create new funding streams for teacher training and new programming in science, technology, engineering and math education. If Congress appropriates $250 million or more for the program, grants would be given on a formula basis, and if less than $250 million is appropriated, grants would be given on a competitive basis. The grants would be targeted at students traditionally unrepresented in the STEM fields: women, low-income students, English language learners and students with disabilities.

    Rejected 16-21.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — Teacher Distribution
      Grijalva, D-Ariz. —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would authorize $3.5 billion for teacher training grants and would require states to show that they will ensure low-income and minority students are not taught by less qualified teachers or principals. It also would set standards for teacher qualification and would amend the Higher Education Act to require teacher training partnership grants to be targeted to programs that target high-need school districts or top-performing alternative certification programs.

    Rejected 16-21.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — Education Department Funding Study
      Brat, R-Va. —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would require an annual study on the reduced federal role in education caused by the bill and the subsequent need for reduced federal spending.

    Adopted 21-16.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — Title I Portability
      Fudge, D-Ohio —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would strike the sections allowing Title I funding portability and removing state and local maintenance of effort funding requirements. It also would require districts to spend roughly equivalent money per student at every school.

    Rejected 16-21.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — English Language Learners Accountability
      Curbelo, R-Fla. —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would delay the assessments of English language learners in school evaluations. These students' assessments in math would not count until they had lived in the U.S. for two years or in reading until they had lived in the U.S. for three years.

    Adopted 22-15.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — Dropout Prevention
    F. Wilson, D-Fla. —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would authorize $125 million for the Education Department to create a coordinated national strategy on dropout prevention activities. The department also would award grants to states or to high schools with dropout rates higher than the national average for activities like remedial education, data analysis and reduction in student to teacher ratios. Schools that receive funds could subgrant money to community-based organizations.

    Rejected 16-21.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — Charter Schools
      Takano, D-Calif. —

    Amendment to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute that would require charter schools to file annual independently audited financial statements, adopt and enforce conflict of interest guidelines and have "ambitious but achievable" academic goals for all students. States would have to develop a system for intervention, revocation and closure of charter schools and chartering agencies.

    Rejected 15-22.

    Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — Democratic Amendments
    R. Scott, D-Va. —

    Motion to adopt, en bloc, six amendments to the Rokita, R-Ind., substitute, including amendments from:

    • Jeffries, D-N.Y., that would require states to adopt "college- and career-ready" content standards and assessments in reading, math and science. The standards would either have to be validated by the state system of higher education or "voluntarily adopted by a significant number of states." It also would mandate conditions for state systems of school accountability.
    • Clark, D-Mass., that would authorize grants to help states create or expand preschool programs for low- and moderate-income four-year-olds. The programs would have to be day-long and of high quality. State matching requirements would increase every year.
    • Adams, D-N.C., that would authorize $250 million to give grants to states, districts and nonprofits to promote a "well-rounded education," including programs for gifted students and classes in foreign languages, geography, economics, history, civics, music and the arts.
    • DeSaulnier, D-Calif., that would authorize grants for learning partnerships like before- and after-school programs and extended school days, and for student safety and health programs like drug and teen pregnancy prevention. It also would authorize grants for "full-service community schools" that provide additional specific qualified services including mentoring, child care, parent education, nutrition services and health and dental care.
    • Fudge, D-Ohio, that would provide an additional $2.1 billion for Title I grants, $2.1 billion for special education grants and $1.3 billion for preschool programs.
    • Scott, D-Va., that would be the Democrats' substitute proposal. It would encompass most of the amendments previously offered by individual members, including requiring states to establish accountability systems that set both academic performance and growth targets, including targets for subgroups of children like minorities or those with special needs; removing the underlying bill’s Title I portability requirement; and establishing a new funding stream for preschool programs.
    • Rejected (en bloc) 16-21.

      Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — Substitute Amendment
        Rokita, R-Ind. —

      Substitute amendment that would tweak the formula for giving Title I grants to school districts by raising the threshold for the percentage of children in poverty by one-hundredth of a percentage point and each population threshold by one child. It also would clarify that states must collaborate with leaders of American Indian tribes when creating statewide education plans and clarify that funding can be used for blended learning models.

      As amended, it would:

    • Require states and schools to report on the performance of children whose parents are in the military.
    • Prohibit the broad disclosure of individual student data.
    • Delay the inclusion of English language learners' tests in school accountability ratings.
    • Require a study on potential savings from program consolidation included in the bill.
    • Adopted by voice vote.

      Feb. 11, 2015 — Committee Vote: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization — Vote to Report

      Reauthorize elementary and secondary education programs and authorize $14.9 billion annually for Title I programs from fiscal 2016 through 2021. As amended, the Title I formula would be tweaked slightly by raising the threshold for the percentage of children in poverty by one-hundredth of a percentage point and each population threshold by one child.

      The bill would create a single local academic flexible grant to give schools more discretion on how to use federal dollars. That money, $2.3 billion annually, would be block granted to states. The grants could be used for academic support, tutoring and activities before or after school, as well as during summer. Funds could not be used for smaller class sizes, construction or teacher pay. The measure would remove all "maintenance of effort" provisions that require states and districts to fund schools at a certain level to remain eligible for federal funding.

      The bill would maintain current annual testing requirements: in math and reading, annually in grades 3-8 and once in grades 9-12; and in science, at least once each during grades 3-5, grades 6-9 and grades 10-12.

      States would have to disaggregate the data to show the performance of low-income and minority children and children with disabilities and, as amended, children whose parents are in the military. They would have to ensure that 95 percent of students in each subgroup participate. States could make accommodations for children with disabilities.

      The bill would eliminate the federal Adequate Yearly Progress school-rating metric and instead let states develop their own systems for evaluating schools, as long as they:

    • Annually measure the academic achievement of all public school students against the state’s math and reading standards.
    • Annually evaluate academic performance of each public school.
    • Include a system for improving low-performing public schools.
    • As amended, English language learners' test scores would not be included in school performance ratings in math until they have lived in the U.S. for two years or in reading until they have lived in the country for three years. States would be allowed to design their own teacher evaluation systems.

      The bill would renew the charter school program and expand funding eligibility to include additional statewide entities like charter school boards, governors and charter support organizations. It also would allow grant money to flow to states using weighted admission lotteries that give "slightly better chances for admission" to educationally disadvantaged students.

      In addition, the bill would give states the option to let Title I money for low-income students follow them to the public or charter school of their choice. The bill would require schools to conduct background checks on teachers and school employees who have contact with children.

      It would prohibit the Education Department from mandating or incentivizing states to adopt any curriculum standards or specific standardized tests.

      As amended, it would prohibit the use of "personal, private" student data for purposes other than assessing student performance and would clarify that all individual data would be protected by school districts and only aggregate data could be sent to the Education Department.

      Also as amended, the bill would require an annual study on the reduced federal role in education caused by the bill and the subsequent need for reduced federal spending.

      Ordered reported favorably to the full House (as amended) 21-16.

  • Feb. 5, 2015Draft bill text released by Rep. J. Kline, R-Minn.

  • Feb. 3, 2015 — Original cosponsor(s): 1

    Rokita, (R-Ind.)
  • Feb. 3, 2015 — Read twice and referred to: House Education and the Workforce, House Financial Services.Congressional Record p. H754